Renwick

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Arthur Renwick Church of England Section 1 Row 7 Plot 150

1 December 1927

DEATH OF REV. ARTHUR RENWICK

 Widespread, sorrow was felt when the news became known of the death of Rev. Arthur Renwick, M.A, Rector  of Christ Church, Gosford. This sad event, which took place on Saturday, cast a gloom not only over Gosford, but over every part of Erina Shire, for all over the area the late Rev. Renwick was well known and highly respected.

 He had been a sufferer for years past, from heart trouble, but no matter how much he endured from this cause— and he suffered a great deal— he was always willing to assist anyone who needed his aid. Some weeks ago he was again severely attacked by his old complaint, and to the grief of a host of friends, this attack proved his last. It was thought he had passed the crisis, and general satisfaction was expressed at his apparent recovery; but on Saturday evening another seizure of the heart came upon him and the brave spirit passed from a weakened body between 6 and  7p.m.  Rev. Renwick was an inspiration to all.

The Shire Council.

Erina Shire Council meeting on Monday, Cr. Taylor made regretful reference to the death of Rev. Renwick,

who he said was not only a fine Church man’, but took a prominent part in district Associations, at which meetings his advice and remarks were always attentively listened to. Most men in his position did not take such a keen and helpful interest in public affairs, and. the district had buffered a real loss in his sad death.

The speaker moved that a letter of condolence be sent to Mrs. Renwick. Cr. Pinkstone seconded, and Dr. Paul also paid a tribute to the deceased clergyman’s worth. The motion -was carried with Councillors and others present standing with bowed heads.

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Fruitgrowers.

I wish to express, on behalf of the Fruitgrowers of our section, my family and myself, our deep sympathy with the family of Arthur Renwick.

The loss to this community is a very great one, for- every movement that had for its purpose the benefit of the community or individual had his active sympathy, His notable speeches and good advice to the children each Empire Day will have an abiding place in the hearts of the people;

His Christianity was larger than his creed, and his charity knew no boundary fences.

He has already built the monument to his memory, and adorned it with the fine gold of honor and the jewels of kindly deeds that have shown men the better way which is practical Christianity. Personally I have lost a dear friend. — W. E. Kirkness.

Before Rev. Renwick’s last illness, Mr. Perc Parry, on behalf of the Confirmation Candidates, presented him with a smoker’s stand.

 The little ceremony took place at the Rectory, and Mr. Renwick was greatly pleased at the loving thought shown by his young friends. The junior parishioners will feel very keenly the loss of their loved and respected Rector.

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8th December 1927

The Good They Have Done Lives On

Memories which come poignantly at this time are this year deepened in pathos by, the death of another fine

district man — the Rev. Arthur Renwick, whose mortal remains were laid to rest a few days ago in the quiet of Point Clare Cemetery.

Two firm friends who had labored with him for the welfare of the community in which they lived — Robert James Baker and John Roe. It is fitting that they lie side by side. Each was a worthy man, whose death came as a sad blow to many relatives and friends: and loving remembrance of each softens such sorrowing recollections as come to us on the anniversary of R. .J. Baker’s death on December 5th, 1925. 

According to a man’s true worth, so is the memory of him that remains long after the first shock of loss is as as uaged. It is two years since Robert James Baker passed from suffering to rest; and it is proof of his true man hood and the greatness of his heart that, his memory is still green with the leaders of his profession in the State, among those who lead the progress of  the district, and with the writers who carry on the business that he built, as well as in the circle that was his glory and pride — his family. 

Bob Baker has gone West — but he will long be remembered by those who valued his counsel in weighty affairs, by those who never asked in vain his help for district improvement, by those who looked up to him as an honored Chief of staff, and by his loved ones who never can forget an irreparable bereavement. The best of men must leave this life some are taken long before we would let them go. But a good man ‘s spirit never dies — it lives in the memory of those who knew him, inspiring them to honest effort as he was industrious, to fair dealing as he was just, to broad-mindedness as lie was tolerant.

Robert James Baker passed from this life on December 5th — at a typical season of his life, when his working hours were wont to be brimful of the cares of the business, and his brief hours of leisure were bright with glad plans for the happiness of others. The coming season’s thoughts are fittingly linked it with the memory of this man who gloried in the Christmas spirit of good will to men. Bob Baker, big-hearted, respected Chief, never-failing friend, devoted husband, loving father, has. gone Beyond; but his memory remains, a beacon. Well may he rest!

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Reverend Renwick was one of the first to set an Honor roll up in the church and was instrumental in the dedicating and organising of the Gosford War Memorial Park. 

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Staples

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Staples Church of England Section 5 row 1 Plot 28

Charles Jefferis Staples (ashes) shares the grave with Phillip Staples aged 27 died 1942, and wife Florence Millicent Staples (ashes).

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C J Staples died in 1973 aged 88, and he lived a very full life. Born in 1885 he spent the first decades of his life as a real estate speculator working with his father sub dividing various parts of what are now well known suburbs of Sydney. His real Estate business was on the corner of Blackwall Rd and Railways street Woy Woy.

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The first mentions of him in the local newspaper are in the early 1920’s he was a good mate of Robert James Baker, Proprietor of the local paper, (see previous posts). He was a part of the “Baker Team” on council and clearly learnt about the power of the press from Baker as he has 100’s of articles and snippets written of him and his exploits.

He kept close ties with the press and kept the journalists informed well after the death of Baker in 1925. He held the Editorship of the Gosford and Wyong Times for a short period.

He was a keen marker outer of roads, He had plans about how the Woy Woy Peninsula would be accessed by road, coupled with his team of V.J. Mackenzie and Charles Fenton the Council Engineer (up until 1927 when Fenton died).

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He is best remembered these days as the name of a lookout as to drive along Woy Woy Road.  This is the only place in the district that he is commemorated.

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One has to remember that Gosford and the Brisbane water district started out as a waterside townships and was very reliant on boats for travelling about to Sydney and beyond. With the avent of motorised vehicles there was added pressure to develop link roads from Sydney to Newcastle and for roads to swing by Gosford and other towns on the way. Many of the roads to the Central Coast we take for granted and use today did not exist until the 1920’s.

In the below link to Trove newspapers, Staples is fighting for a road to join to the Newcastle Road via Patonga and Mullet Creek. This road did not eventuate.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/166836857?searchTerm=ANOTHER%20MOTION%20BY%20CR.%20STAPLES%20DEFEATED.%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20&searchLimits=l-title=689|||sortby=dateAsc|||l-category=Article

The next link to Trove newspapers Staples is finding a route from Gosford to the Newcastle Rd this road did eventuate.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-title=689&sortby=dateAsc&l-category=Article&q=Mooney+Route+Inspected

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When plans for an appropriate World War 1 Memorial were underway Staple put forth for a Memorial District Hospital, but got voted down for the Gosford Swimming pool and cenotaph. He continued to pursue the development of a hospital and it finally came to pass.

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He became the district Coroner after the retirement of William Kirkness (who was 75 years of by that time) and his first case was a murder suicide at Ourimbah, this incident became known as the “Ourimbah Tragedy” and here is the newspaper accounts of that incident. This incident became national headlines but strangely was not reported at all locally.

24th June 1937

Western Mail (Perth W.A.)

FAMILY WIPED OUT.

BODIES FOUND IN HOUSE

Theory of Murder and Suicide

SYDNEY, June 20.-A ghastly discovery was made in a small home on an orchard property at Ourimbah Creek, 13 miles from Gosford, this afternoon when a family of four was found dead. A woman and her two sons had their heads battered ia with an axe and their throats Were cut. The woman’s husband was lying dead in the kitchen with his throat cut.

The victims were:

HUMPHRIES, Leslie Hugh (43), temporary linesman.

HUMPHRIES, Martha Amelia (37), his wife.

HUMPHRIES, Owen Leslie (7).

HUMPHRIES, Clarence William (S).

When police and ambulance men from Gosford entered the house, they state, it resembled a shambles. The police are of the opinion that Humphries became suddenly demented, probably through financial worries, and smashed in the heads of his wife and two sons, then cutting their throats with a razor and before he killed himself with the razor.

It is believed that the tragedy occurred early this afternoon. When Miss Z. Lang, daughter of the postmaster at Palmdale, was cycling along the road to her home, she saw Humphries gesticulating wildly as he rushed about. When he saw Miss Lang, he shouted to her: “Will you call the sergeant. I have done it.”

Miss Lang hurried to her father and he, with two men, went to the home of Humphries. They were met with a ghastly sight The body of Mrs. Humphries was lying in the kitchen covered with a blanket and near her was the body of her husband. He apparently had been dead only a few minutes. The head of Mrs. Humphries was shockingly injured.

Soon afterwards, Sergeant Blackley and the Gosford ambulance arrived and in the bedroom they discovered the bodies of the two boys lying on a bed with their heads smashed in and then throats gashed so extensively that they appeared to have been almost decapitated.

Not all the cases were as dramatic as the Ourimbah Tragedy, he over saw many vehicle related deaths be they pedestrians, passengers or drivers many of these deaths were on the very roads he had marked out the decade before.

Staples observed that by 1937 vehicles had became faster by the year and that the grade of the hills and the number of curves and corners had remained the same, not changing with the speed of the vehicle speed leading to the increase of fatalities on the Central Coast roads.

He also noted that the Central Coast was approximately equidistant from both Sydney and Newcastle and was in what he called the sleep zone with many drivers dying asleep at the wheel. He dealt with x10 road fatalities in his first year.

He was a strong advocate for warning signage and speed limits and driving to the conditions.

Florence his wife was an active member of the CWA.

Staples only son Phillip, was a radio technician/repairman whilst in Gosford and one can not help but think he would have applied those skill when he join the armed forces during world War 2. The Australian War Memorial has not as yet digitised his war record but he died during that conflict in 1942. The Local newspapers did not report that death either.

 

Edith Gell

Edith Gell Church of England Section 9 Row 1 Plot 2map template

Frank Gell joined the AIF in March 1916, he was 6 foot tall and 26 years of age. He was sent to the front in January 1917 and was killed in action By May 1917. Edel Gell, known as Edith was his widow.

Frank Gell’s war record
https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=4104373

Thu 15 Aug 1918 –

The Gosford Times and Wyong District Advocate

SOLDIER’S COTTAGE

Handed Over by Of fellows.

On Saturday afternoon last, in the presence of a very large gathering, the handing over ceremony was performed by the District Order of the I O O F.

The cottage erected by that Society for the widow and orphans of the late Private F. Gell,

who was killed in action in France last year. Since the outbreak of the War the Manchester Unity Oddfellows.

Of which the deceased soldier was a member the established a Fund for the purpose of assisting disabled members and their dependents, and Saturday’s function was a striking example of the practical work being done by the Society in this direction.

The local Branch of the Order has also given valuable assistance, with the organising of the entertainment for this event, given by “The Merrymakers”.

Mr. F. A. Stayner, Superintendent of the Boy’s Home, occupied the chair. He briefly outlined the  noble work performed by the Society and Unit of the Gosford Branch, as instanced that day, and had much pleasure in extending n hearty welcome to the District Officers, who had come to take part in the opening ceremony for such a worthy a cause.

The Chairman then called on the President of Erina Shire to address the gathering, and in so doing Mr. Archibold stated that it gave him extreme pleasure to be present at such an auspicious occasion, although he hoped it would be the last, as he had no desire of his to see widows as a result of this terrible war.

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But if such was to be the case he felt sure that Gosford could respond just as nobly in the future as in the past.

He had had the pleasure of knowing the deceased soldier (Private Gell) since he was a boy, and also his widow, and he was proud to have had their acquaintance. He also spoke highly of  his associations with Mr. and Mrs. Hall and family, of whom Mrs Gell was a member Referring to Private Gell the speaker eulogized the spirit of duty which prompted him to enlist and go forth to fight for the protection of his wife and children and the freedom of the civilized world.

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He sympathised with Mrs Gell in the loss of her good husband, but she had the satisfaction of knowing that she was residing among a hospitable people who would never see her in want. Mr, Archbold made reference to the healthy position at the front to-day, but advised his hearers not to

become overconfident. Everybody was expected to do their best to win this war. They had to prevent at all costs Germany from dominating the world.

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Personally, he had no respect for a German no matter how long he had lived in this country, and the only way lie could regard a German us good was when he was dead. On the other hand he bad the greatest respect for our own 6oidiers, and asked everyone to give consideration to the returned hero.

Of this number 600 had made the supreme sacrifice, whilst 700 had been invalided home. He was proud to say that the Society had pledged itself to the last copper, and no member or ‘heir dependents would ever be in want while there was a pound left in the bank.

He was proud of the members of the Society and members of all other Societies who had nobly responded to the call.

Brother Purkins, Deputy Grand Master, supported the remarks of the previous speaker, and said it was with feelings of pleasure mingled with sadness that lie was present on an occasion such as this On Monday they would be carrying out a similar duty at Liverpool. He hoped it would I not be long before the Oddfellows had a big surplus, whereby they would lie in a position to help brothers ! returning from the war. He was pleased to see so man} of the members of the Gosford Branch present, and congratulated the people on the interest they had shown in coming forward that day. | Bro Muston, , D.G.M. of Cumberland District, also spoke.

Brother Trohair then called on Mr. Wallace Moore, the contractor, to hand over the key of the cottage, and in so doing complimented Mr. Moore on the excellence, of hia work, the report of the Society’s Inspector justifying him in saying that the contract had been well and faithfully carried out.

The Chairman then unlocked the door, and presented Mrs. Gell with the key Mr. Thomas Hail, on behalf of Mrs. Gell, sincerely thanked them for the assistance the Society had rendered in providing his daughter with a home, also the officers for their presence there that day, and particularly the members of the Gosford Branch, and all other kind friends who had in any

way assisted to bring about the occasion of that afternoon’s assemblage. He also tendered his thanks to the ladies of the Gosford Red Cross, and concluded by saying that he could not find words to adequately express his feelings of gratitude towards the people he had had the honor of living among for so long.

Inscribed medals were presented to the following returned soldier members of the local Lodge, with honors of the Order : — Drivers J. F. Sterland H. T May and W. Sterland, Trooper B. Ward, and Private W. Goodsir.

Cheers and the National Anthem brought an interesting afternoon to a close, after which refreshments were served.

 

Scotts

Robert Donald Scott Church Of England Section 1 Row 1 Plot 6

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The Scott Family.

23 November 1916

Death of Miss Scott.

Miss Sarah Maria Scott, who died at her residence, Point Clare, on Thurs

day last, was 83 years of age, and was the second daughter of the late Mr,

Thomas  A. Scott, after whom the railway platform, ‘Tascott,’ is named.

The funeral took place on Saturday, the remains being interred in the

Church of England portion of the new cemetery at Point Clare.

Rev. A. Renwick, Rector of Christ Church, conducted the burial service, and

Messrs. Creighton & Sons had charge of the mortuary arrangements.

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Robert Scott, another of T.A. Scott’s sons was making a living running a holiday home at the former family home called Waterview  (it was situated on the small hillock near Tascott railway station, now called Waterveiw Place). When this happened.

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16 December 1920

Railway Fatality at Tascott.

DEATH OF MR. R. D. SCOTT.

It is with deep regret that we have to record the death of Mr. Robert Donald Scott, an old resident of Tascott, which occurred in tragic circumstances on Friday last. Deceased left his home that morning and was returning from over the line about mid-day while the storm was at its height. As the roads were impassible he was compelled to traverse the railway line and was walking between the rails when overtaken by the Brisbane express bound for Sydney. Death must have been instantaneous. The accident was not noticed by the driver or fireman of the train. The tragic circumstances surrounding Mr. Scott’s death are heightened by the fact that hi§ son was standing on the verandah of his home and witnessed the accident which he was powerless to avert.

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At the inquest held at Gosford on Monday last a verdict of accidental death was returned. The late Mr. Scott was one of the oldest residents of the Brisbane Water district and was beloved and respected by all who came in contact with him. He was a son of the late Thomas Alison Scott, who was the original grantee of the land surrounding Point Clare and Tascott. He leaves a widow and one son, Mr. Thomas William Scott, who reside at Tascott. Two sisters, the Misses Martha and Jane Scott, reside at Point Clare, and another sister, Mrs. Annie Herbert, is at present in England, while his brothers are Messrs Archibald Scott, of Point Clare, and James William Scott, of Marrickville.

The funeral took place on Sunday at the Point Clare cemetery, the Rev. Arthur Renwick conducting the burial service.

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Jane Scott was one other of the many children of Thomas A. Scott. To which whom the suburb TASCOTT is named after. Having lived all her life in the Brisbane Water district, she clearly was not coping with the move to a nursing home in Sydney, decides to escape.

22 February 1923

ACCIDENTAL DEATH.

A verdict of accidental death was returned by the Sydney Coroner, when he held an inquiry into the death of Miss Jane Scott, aged 81, who until recently resided at Point Clare. , Deceased was an inmate of the Nursing Home at Petersham, but appeared to be discontented, and on January 15, during the temporary absence of the matron, she apparently climbed over the balcony rail and slid down the verandah post to within a few feet of the ground, when she fell. She died on February 15 from her injuries.  

22 October 1931

Death of Miss Martha Scott The death of the nonagenarian Miss Scott, which occurred on Oct. 11, and which was referred to in our last issue, recalls a number of interesting facts in connection ‘with the early history of the Brisbane Water district.

Her father, the late Thomas Scott, was the first man to grow sugar cane in Australia. He commenced its cultivation at Port Macquarie, and later, when he went to reside at Point Clare, he grew cane there, but soil and climatic conditions proved unsuitable. As the pioneer of the sugar industry in Australia, the Government granted Thomas Scott a pension. He was then a man of advanced age, but he continued to draw the pension until his death at the age of 105 years. His wife, Annie Scott, also died at the age of 105.

They reared a large family of 7 daughters and 5 sons. Three of their children are still living. They are Annie (Mrs. Herbert), who is in England; Mr. Archibald Scott (Point Clare), and Mr. James William Scott (Woy Woy). Strange is the fact that four of the family passed away on October 16, and all at Point Clare.There are 7 of the 12, of Thomas Allison Scott’s children buried here at Point Clare Cemetery, they are, Sarah, Jane, Robert, Martha, James, Harriet and Archibald.

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Robert Donald Scott.

AN APPRECIATION.

On Friday, December 10, As the result of a train accident near his home and railway station, Tascott, there passed away one of the best known pioneers of Brisbane Water — Robert Donald Scott,

Born in the district where he had lived tor over sixty-eight years, Mr. Scott was probably one of the most widely-respected residents. To know him was to love him. The present writer has had the privilege of acquaintance with him for twenty years and of appreciating his sterling qualities. Of quiet and retiring character, ho nevertheless possessed shrewd judgment and business faculty in his dealings, but his kindliness of disposition and unswerving honesty of purpose, combined with a wholesome sense of humor endeared him to all with whom Le came in contact. It may be said ‘truthfully that he made no enemies, oven among those with whom he was not always in agreement

For a man of his years he accomplished more in the way of daily work than is usually done by many much younger men. Methodical habits and consistent energy, aided by a sound mind in a sound body, were the secret of this. He lived the simple life, carefully conserved the blessing of health which was bestowed upon him, and tried to do all the good he could in passing through life.

This outlook and object are surely noble, but with Robert Scott they were faithfully adhered to, and brought to him great peace of mind and contentment.

The late Mr. Scott came of excellent family, of Scotch descent. As most residents of the district  now, his father, Thomas Allison Scott, was the first Clerk of Petty Sessions at Brisbane Water, and a man who made rely markable efforts early last century to J establish sugar-growing in New South Wales.

For his w ork in this direction honor to his memory has been accorded recently by the Royal Agricultural  Society of N.S.W. He lived to the age of 105 years, and lies buried in the old cemetery at Point Frederick, Gosford.

His uncle was Sir James Scott, Admiral in the Royal Navy, and other members of his father’s family were distinguished in mercantile pursuits.

His mother came from England as a child, and after her marriage lived at Point Clare for over seventy years, dying at the mature age of 93.

Two brothers, Archibald and William, and three sisters survive him. Two of the latter, the Misses Martha and Jane Scott, have been resident at Point Clare for many years; the other sister married Dr. Herbert, and was once resident in Gosford, but has been long away from Australia.

The late Robert Scott spent the earlier years of his life at the place of his birth. In his thirties he went to y. the metropolis, and for a time engaged in business. While there he also married. His native hills called to him, however, and he soon returned to Point Clare, where Mrs. Scott established, and developed to a wonderful degree, the boarding-house so long known as Waterview, a name very familiar to holiday-seekers throughout  the length and breadth of the State.

This famous house of accommodation, although Mrs. Scott retired from its management some years ago, remained in its old location until twelve months since, when unfortunately it was destroyed by fire. It was to serve the needs of this house that the Tascott platform was erected by the Railway Commissioners, the name being derived from the initials and surname of Mr.

Scott’s father. (T.A.Scott).

Mr. Robert Scott is survived by his Wife and son, who live near the old house.

The areas of the surrounding were his property, and at the time of his death he was actively engaged in preparing for sale a sub division, including the ‘Waterview’ property.

In closing this sketch, which it is? is all too imperfect to do justice sterling worth of its subject, what I write desires to record a profound sense of deprivation, both to himself and to the district, by the untimely removal of one who, had he been would have continued in the paths of large-hearted kindliness so lovingly followed, by him in the past.

His labors here have ended, and he is at rest, and so who remain are the

poorer by the loss of his benevolent and beneficient personality from amongst us, but his good works and legacy will not be readily forgotten by those who knew him, and will serve as his lasting memorial.

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21July 1916

Obituary.

Mrs Burt, aged 77 years, passed away at the residence of her only daughter, Mrs Archie Scott, West Gosford, at 9 o’clock on Saturday night.

Deceased lady was the relict of the late Sydney Burt, who in the early days, was a Sydney lawyer and also developed into a prominent business man, doing a large trade in shipping horses to India. It is related that on one occasion he shipped over 200 head and did not insure them. The first night after their departure he dreamt that he saw the vessel wrecked and the horses drowned.

Next morning he went to an insurance office and insured the horses. Sure enough two days later the Shine was wrecked at the very place Burt dreamt about, and not a horse was saved. Mr. Burt spent some years in Fiji, and during his career made, speculated, and lost three fortunes.

The late Mrs. Burt was a resident of Gosford for about ten years, and had been- ailing for the past three months. The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon, the remains being interred in Point Clare cemetery.

Rev, A. Renwick read the burial service.

Bennett

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Alfred Bennett Church of England Section 8 Row 20 Plot 1

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18 August 1953

TRAGIC DEATH OF ORCHARDIST

 Late last Saturday afternoon, Alfred Hilton Bennett, 51 years, a well known Mangrove Mountain orchardist, was found dead, with a gunshot wound in the region of his heart.

 The tragedy occurred on his property, about half a mile from his home. There are no suspicious circumstances, state Gosford police.

 Detective Cox, who carried out an investigation, was told that at about 2.30 pm Mr Bennett informed his wife and elder son that he was going to take a walk down to the cauliflower patch and would take his dog and gun with him as he might get a rabbit on the way.

The son left half an hour later to play tennis and when he returned about 5.30, he found that his father was still away from home. The son went in search of his father and eventually found his body on a bush track with a double barrelled shotgun lying beside him.

From an investigation on the spot. Detective Cox believes that Mr Bennett tripped over a fallen tree across the track and in his fall one barrel of the gun was accidentally discharged.

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The subsequent Inquest found,

11 September 1953

ORCHARPIST SHOT NEAR HOME TRAGIC DISCOVERY OF BODY BY HIS SON

A son who went looking for his orchardist father at Mangrove Mt on August 15 found him dead, victim of the accidental discharge of a 12-gauge shotgun.

The District Coroner (Mr. C. J. Staples) returned this finding at a Magisterial inquiry at Gosford on Wednesday into the death of Alfred Hilton Bennett, 51, of Wiseman’s Ferry Road, Mangrove Mt. evidence at the inquiry disclosed that on August 15, Bennett left his home at 2.30 pm, accompanied by his dog.

He took the shot-gun with him, telling his wife he intended shooting a rabbit for the dog. When he did not return by 5 pm, his son, William, went to look for him.

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 TRIPPED ON LOG

The son found his father’s body about 300 yards from the house with a gunshot wound in the chest. Const. K. A. Rhodes, of Gosford police, said Bennett I had apparently tripped on a log, discharging the gun when he fell.

Bennett’s widow. Iris Melba Bennett, told the Coroner that Bennett had had no financial or domestic worries. ‘The home was as happy as could be wished for,’ she added.

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Frederick Cox

Fred Cox Methodist Section 1 Row 1 Plot 1

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First Burial at Point Clare Cemetery 1916 and Auctioneer and Trader Extraordinaire 

Methodist Section 1 Row 1 plot 1

Frederick Cox arrived in 1909 and bought a pre existing business from William Burns. It was a mixed business with branches in Gosford and Woy Woy. He traded in some land deals and was a licensed Auctioneer.

In 1911 we have Fred Cox proposing land sites with the council for a new cemetery. He was the President of the Progress Association and was one of the stronger voices of opposition when another proposed site on Presidents Hill was put forward.

15th September, 1911

New Cemetery Sites.

Mr. T W Connelly, District Surveyor, visited Gosford on Tuesday last and, accompanied by Mr. F. Cox, President of the Progress Association, inspected two proposed sites for the new cemetery, both  situated on the western side of Narara Creek — one on Crown land, and the other on land the property of Mr Fagan. We understand that Mr. Connelly favoured the latter site, and intends sending an officer to make further inquiries.

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29 September 1911

Proposed New Cemetery For Gosford.

For a considerable time there has been a growing dissatisfaction with the site of the present cemetery, owing to the lower portion being so swampy that people object to burying their relatives and friends in graves that fill with water as soon as they are dug, with the result that the dryer portion, known as the general portion, is mostly used, and will in a few years become crowded. During last year the District Surveyor, Mr. T. W. Conolly, paid a visit to the cemetery at the invitation of some of the residents, and at once decided that something should be done in the  way of securing a fresh site and closing the present one.

He recommended a position on the western slope of President’s Hill suitable as to dryness and elevation, but strongly objected to by the townspeople, for the reason that the locality was too valuable for residential purposes and was within the population area. The Progress Association then offered to submit to Mr. Conolly several sites more suitable for the purpose, and recommendations were accordingly made of several areas which were inspected by the Surveyor, the best in his opinion being selected, and the Assistant Surveyor sent to test the site for depth of soil and drainage. The Secretary of the Progress Association, Mr. W. E. Kirkness, is now in receipt of a letter from the District Surveyor, requesting that the public be asked to signify their approval or rejection of the proposed site, which is about 24 acres in area, being Government Subdivision Nos. 133, 134 and 142, adjoining Messrs. Fagan’s property on Cooranbene Creek, West Gosford.

Little did Fred Cox know that he would be the first to buried at Point Clare Cemetery in January 1916. There is a stone in the Catholic Section, RC 1,1,1 that mentions a death in 1915 (Cecil Morris at the battle of Lone Pine) but there was no body buried in that Grave at that time.

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25th January 1917

IN MEMORIAM.

COX. — In loving remembrance of our dear father, Frederick Cox, who died January 25th, 1916. Inserted by his loving sons, Gunner R. K. Cox and Driver C. A. Cox, A.I.F.

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31 August 1922

MRS COX

OBITUARY.

MRS. FREDERICK COX

The community of Gosford were deeply Shocked on learning yesterday that Mrs. Susie Cox, relict of the late Mr. Frederick Cox, had passed away at her home, ‘Cora Lynn,’ East Gosford, about 9 a.m. The deceased lady complained of not feeling well last I Sunday, and later on Dr. Paul was called in unexpectedy — caused her relatives anxiety, serious symptoms being manifest, and, despite all that could be done by medical skill and expert nursing, she passed away* as above stated, at 9 o ‘clock on Wednesday morning, the cause of death owing to heart failure.

The late Mrs. Cox, who was 60 years of age, was a native of Kelso, Singleton, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bailey, one of the district ‘s best known families. Mr. Bailey died some years ago, but Mrs. Bailey still resides at Dunolly, Singleton, in her 80th year. Miss Bailey married Mr. Frederick Cox at Singleton, and her husband passed away at Gosford in January, 1916, his death being a great loss to residents of town and district. The late Mr. Cox was a splendid townsman, and his memory will be treasured by relatives and friends for many years to come. Mr. and Mrs. Cox came to Gosford about 15 years ago.

Mr. Cox purchasing the storekeeping business then carried on, by Mr. William Burns. Some years later, Mr. Cox retired from active business life, and built a beautiful home, ‘Cora Lynn,’ at East Gosford. During the war period Mrs. Cox and her daughter, Miss Ivy Cox, took a prominent part in Red Cross work, and many a kindly and unostentatious deed stands to the memory of a kind arid charitable woman. Two of her sons served in the big war, and returned after the Armistice had been signed. Of the marriage there were three sons and one ‘daughter, all of whom survive their  parents — Messrs Milton Cox (Parkes), Ray Cox (Gosford), Clare Cox (Sydney), and Miss Ivy Cox (Gosford). To them we offer our deepest sympathy in their irreparable loss, the funeral takes place this afternoon, in Point Clare cemetery, where the remains of Mr. *Cox were laid to rest some years ago.

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Jack Dransfield

Jack Dransfield Church of England Section 1 Row 2 Plot 39

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22 March 1917

A “Something.”

The following is an extract from a letter received by Master Joe Dransfield, Ourimbah, from Gunner Edmund Duffy, written from Somewhere in France : — ” I received your welcome letters. We are not allowed to send any souvenirs from the front to Australia. If I had the chance I would enlist a dozen times over, which every self-thinking young man should do in this war of all-nations. There are hundreds of young single men in Australia who shiver at the thought of enlistment. I consider that a young fellow with no responsibilities who will not attempt to enlist is not worthy of the name of “man,” but is a “something” that only thinks of his own skin. It will be the shirker on whom the worry of this will fall.

This young man Joe Dransfield, received this letter a year before he enlisted for World War 1 from his mate, Gunner Edmond Duffy.

Joe I am not certain is he was a cousin, a nephew (?) was somehow connected to the Dransfield Family from Ourimbah.  Gosford and the surrounding districts was a very active ground for local patriot volunteer organizations (Red Cross) and returned servicemen organizations.  A letter like the above was stirring the war effort and Joe joined up in 1918. Social events with parades and floats were common place. Even the provision of a house to one war widow to live in, show the support and popularity of these events.

The Dransfield family of Ourimbah was headed by Mr. Dransfield who was the Head Teacher of Ourimbah Public School and turns up in the local paper from time to time. The Grave we are visiting is the grave of the Headmasters son Jack Dransfield, 1919.

From his war record, Joseph Dransfield, we find that he is 22 years of age, 5 foot 11 inches tall, had a mole on his right shoulder, he enlisted the day after Anzac Day 1918. For a young man, He was married, yet widowed. His next of kin is listed as James Adams, step father and his belongings willed to Eileen M Bell. Religion is listed as Congregational. He has worked around locomotives, and has been accepted into the Railways Company. There is a letter from a higher ranking officer describing him as brainy.

Joe Dransfields War Record.

https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=3521454

Jacks father had a hand in the Australia day celebrations of 1916 at Gosford, and organised these costumes.

Joe Dransfield’s next of kin was notified just under a year from the enrollment date, that he was to return to Australia on the 19th April, 1919. He moved to the Eastern suburbs of Sydney by 1928.

With the Returning Soldiers they brought with them a deadly strain of Flu, a version of the Global Spanish Flu Epidemic of 1919.

Meanwhile in Ourimbah The Headmaster was having some fun with the kids, I reckon Little Jack (aged 12) Dransfield saw some of the following event that his father seemed to have something to do with.

12th June, 1919

Ourimbah.

Our Public School now has four teachers as well as the capable head master, Mr. Dransfieid  The “Kiddies” of the town had the time of their lives on Tuesday afternoon, when a man dressed up as Charlie Chaplin, paraded the main road and portrayed ‘Charlie’ in almost lifelike style.

Very soon nearly the whole of the school children followed up the caricaturist, and it was pleasing to hear the well-behaved — with a few exception? — hilarity of the girls and boys. This was advertising a picture show held in the School of Arts last  night, and the result was advantageous, for from 7 p.m children in crowds with their parents or friends were to be seen streaming to the show.

Then 3 weeks later, this happens to Young master Jack Dransfield.

3rd July 1919

LISAROW.

(From Our Correspondent.)

Bleak westerly winds and heavy frosts are being experienced this week, and after the pleasant weather we have bad for the last few months, the change is not altogether agreeable, but as we are past the  shortest day we can look forward to soon having warmer days.

The flu is still with us, but fortunately most of the Lisarow cases have been rather a mild type, and all have escaped having a relapse. Deep sympathy is felt here for Mr. and Mrs. Dransfield in the death of their little son Jack, and we hope to soon hear that their other son, who is also suffering from influenza, has fully recovered.

The many friends of Miss Fenn will be pleased to hear that she is now recovering from an attack of influenza.  Noticed your par in last week’s issue re reports from correspondents.

As your Lisarow correspondent was in bed with ‘flu I think he might be easily excused Lance-Corporal Reg Harrison arrived home on Saturday evening and received a warm welcome from his relatives and friends. We trust that the ‘flu epidemic will soon pass away so that we can give him a public welcome.

Big consignments of citrus fruits are now being forwarded to Sydney and Melbourne from Lisarow station, and good prices are being realised.

our jack

3rd July 1919

OURIMBAH.

(From our Correspondent.)

Owing to the influenza epidemic the Red Cross Society have decided to postpone for a month the benefit social organised for the widow of the late Private Nancarrow.

The district is gradually emerging from an attack of the ‘flu, and the Gosford Doctors have had a busy time.

There have been a number of bad cases, but thank God there was only due fatality. That was Master Jack Dransfield, son of the headmaster of the State School here. The lad was a smart and intelligent, and a general favourite .Double pneumonia set in, and in 48 hours he was dead General sympathy is felt for the bereaved parents and family, in which I join.

The remains were interred in Point Clare cemetery.

3rd July, 1919

Dransfield

Return Thanks.

MRS. DRANSFIELD & FAMILY, of Ourimbah, gratefully thank Mr. Ingram and son, also Mr. Ern Hawkins, for their kind help on the death of our dear son, Jack; also Mrs. Murtagh and Mrs. Ingram, for their kindness. Mr. and Mrs.  Dransfield and Family thank all kind friends for their sympathy, wreaths, cards, and letters of condolence in their sad bereavement.

7th August, 1919

Ourimbah Public School.

Mr. Dransfield, headmaster of the Ourimbah State School, has received the appended official letter from Mr. A. Edden, MP. ‘ Department of Education, Sydney, 26th July. — I have to advise you that the Minister for Education has approved of the preparation of plans and specifications for the remodelling and extension of the school building at Ourimbah. The matter has been referred to the architect of this Department with a view to the necessary action being taken. — Yours, P. Board, Under Secretary.’

 

21 April 1921

VALEDICTORY TO MR. & MRS. A. J. DRANSFIELD & FAMILY.

Residents of town and district were surprised to hear of the sudden departure of Mr. and Mrs. Dransfield and grimily from our midst. Mr. Dransfield has been headmaster of our Public School during the last 17 years, and it is regretted by all that his transfer to Patterson came so unexpectedly. Much credit is due to the Misses Zelma Morris, Margaret Young, and Lola Russell in making a hurried collection, with the limited time at their disposal, to fittingly convey the feelings of respect and esteem from all residents of the district. At 3 p.m. on Friday a representative gathering assembled at the Public School to bid farewell to Mr. and Mrs. Dransfield and family.

Mr. A. Pitt, who occupied the chair, said he had not been in the district very long, still it afforded him very great pleasure to say a few words on behalf of the citizens of Ourimbah and district, in recognition of the splendid teaching qualities of Mr. Dransfield. He has carried out his duties to the entire satisfaction of the public, being ably assisted by an energetic staff of assist ants, in the bringing up of a young generation, who will have to face the world, to encounter many trials, hard ships and temptations, and he sincerely trusted that they would benefit by the tuition of their late headmaster.

Mrs. Luxford, wife of our local station master, in a few well-spoken words, then presented Mr. Dransfield with a hand some pocket wallet, Mrs. Dransfield being the recipient of a beautiful earthenware nickel moulded salad bowl.

The Misses May and Joy Dransfield were presented with a silver purse and a Nellie Stewart bangle, respectively. Mr. Dransfield very feelingly responded on behalf of himself and family. He said he was very much taken by surprise, and offered his sincerest thanks for the gifts they had received.

All the children were assembled in a classroom, and were addressed by their departing master. He gave them good advice, and instructed them in the path they should follow to become worthy citizens of our Great Empire. The gathering then dispersed with three cheers for Mr. Dransfield, which were heartily given by the children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Foster

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Alexandra Foster Church of England Section 1 Row 4  Plot 93

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4 September 1924

Page 1

Mrs. Harold  Foster aged 22 years, died at Gosford on Friday last under pathetic circumstances.

Same edition but now on Page 11,

4 September 1924

MRS. H. H. FOSTER.

The death occurred last Friday night of Mrs. Alexandra Lillian Foster, wife of Mr. Harold H. Foster, at Hill Street, North Gosford, following the birth of their first child. Mrs. Foster had been away from Gosford, and was on her way home when she was taken violently ill.

 The death of this lady, who was only 22  years of age, and was the daughter of Mr and Mrs Charles Weaver, and well-known to Gosford residents, is a very sad one, and is a great blow to her husband and other relatives and friends.

The interment took place at the Church of England portion of Point Clare Cemetery on Saturday, the last rites being performed by the Rev. Thomas, of Epping, who had married Mr. and Mrs. Foster, and the Rev. A. Renwick.

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Richard Henry Creighton and family

map templateDulciebella Mary Creighton mother of Richard Henry Creighton The article notes she is buried at Point Frederick Cemetery with her husband, that is a long since closed down cemetery for really old school locals. Her son Richard is possibly the first of his family to be buried at Point Clare Cemetery.

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4th March 1920

DEATH OF MRS. CREIGHTON,

SENIOR.

On Sunday last Mrs. Dulciebella Mary Creighton, relict of the late Robert Creighton, died at Gosford at the age of 88 years, after a brief illness extending over three weeks. Deceased was born at Balmain, and when a girl came to Booker’s Bay, Woy Woy, where her father, Mr. Henry Piper, carried on business as a shipwright.

Practically all her life she resided in Brisbane Water district with the exception of a few years spent in Sydney and Melbourne. She leaves a family of three — Mr. Richard Creighton (Gosford), Mrs Harry Hammond (Gosford), and Mrs. W. Cassells (Camperdown), two other of the children (a son and daughter) failing to survive their mother. The late Mrs Creighton also leaves a number of  grandchildren and great grandchildren. The remains were interred in the Church of England portion of Point Frederick Cemetery, being laid to rest alongside those of her husband. Rev. A. Renwick, Rector of Christ Church, conducted the graveside service.

Richard Henry Creighton married into the Meehan family in 1916, Richard and Kathleen are buried here at Point Clare Cemetery, in the Lawn section. Lawn 5 row 5 plot 62

26 October 1916

WEDDING. CREIGHTON—MEEHAN.
A pretty wedding took place at Christ Church, Gosford, on Tuesday, October 17th, when Miss Kathleen, third daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Edward Meehan, of Newcastle, was married to Richard Henry (Dick), only son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard
Creighton, of Gosford. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Arthur Renwick (Rector) assisted by the choir. Mr. J. W. Lees presided at the organ. The church was very prettily decorated by Mrs. F. Wheeler, who also constructed a handsome
archway of white lilies, sweet peas, and roses, in front of the altar, under which the happy couple were joined in the bonds of matrimony. The bride, who was given away by her uncle, Mr. Jack Allen, of Randwick, wore a beautiful china silk costume with hat to match. The bridal bouquet was of white sweet peas, stock and roses, and, with a silver purse, was the gift of the bridegroom. The bride was attended by Miss Agnes Meehan (sister of the bride) who wore a pale pink silk crepe frock with hat to match, and Miss Edith Creighton (sister of the bridegroom) who was attired in a cream silk crepe frock with hat to match. Their bouquets were of pink sweet peas, stock and
roses, which, with gold bangles, were the gifts of the bridegroom. The bride’s gift to the bridegroom was a gold mounted fountain pen. Mr. Walter Briscoe (of Greta) acted as best man, and Mr. Thomas Hennessey (of Randwick) as groomsman. Rev. A. Renwick presided at the reception, which was subsequently held at the Gosford Hall, when over sixty guests were received by Mrs. Creighton (mother of the bridegroom), who was attired in a black silk poplin with hat to harmonise. After the usual toasts
were honored, singing and dancing was indulged in. On leaving for the honeymoon, which is being [held?] at the Blue Mountains, the bride was attired in a beautiful blue satin charmeuse, with black tulle hat relieved with blue water lilies.

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Richard Henry Creighton

3rd Generation Funeral Director

DOD 22 September 1931      Church of England Section 1 Row 4 Plot 88

Aged 71 years

His family moved here in 1844,

His grandfather was a carpenter/builder who began making coffins and then went into funeral directing from that as a start into the industry. His business was the first Funeral Directors in the district. The workshop and residence was on the old Public School site where the proposed tax office is to be built….. death and taxes… hmm he made the pews for the Church of England church,,, the one that got moved from East Gosford. Richards Father was also a builder and built the old public school then followed his father into the funeral directing business.

Richard also followed into the family business making him the third generation , and the current generation of Creighton’s is the 5th. Richard loved cricket and sailing and was involved in organising and participating in regattas and competitions on the Brisbane Waters. Richard married into the Parry family another well known Gosford family name, marrying Emily Parry. The nature of his work made him one of the most respected men in the region, he was seen as a friend in need, never a bad word was said of him and was not prone to gossip. He saw many locals in their moments of venerableness. Richard was on the verge of retiring with his son learning the business and had book a holiday with his wife when he died. The first funeral his son participated in was that of his fathers.

24 September 1931

BEYOND THE VEIL
MR. R. H. CREIGHTON.
The death of Mr. Richard Henry Creighton, which took place at his residence at Gosford last Monday, following an attack of pleurisy and pneumonia, removes one of the oldest and most respected residents of the Brisbane Water District. Born at Gosford 71 years ago, his life was spent in this district except for short periods when he was engaged in gold-mining in the Narrandera district. He was a man of exceptionally high personal character, one who appreciated and lived up to a true ideal of service to his fellow man.
As a builder and contractor he was known throughout the district for the excellence of his craftsmanship, and everything that he did was characterized by the same thoroughness. For many years he had conducted the undertaking business of Messrs. R. H. Creighton & Son.
The late Mr. Creighton is survived by a widow, four daughters, Mrs. J. Sohier (West Gosford), Mrs. Don Robertson (Newcastle), Mrs. C. Morris (Gosford), and Mrs. J. Barnes (Gosford), and one son, Mr. Richard Creighton, of Bronte and Gosford.
The funeral took place yesterday afternoon, the Rev. A. E. Saxon conducting the service in the Church of England portion of the Point Clare Cemetery. An account of the funeral and other particulars of the life of the deceased will appear in our next issue.

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Here is a September 1951 advertisement for the business

A Century of Service

Established in Gosford in 1844, the business of Funeral Directors has been carried on continuously over a period of 107 years by succeeding generations of the Creighton family — an unbroken line to the fifth generation.

The founder, Robert Creighton, was succeeded by his son, Robert Creighton Jnr., he in turn by his son, Richard Henry Creighton, followed by Richard Henry Creighton Jnr., whose

son, Richard John Creighton, represents the fifth generation of the family actively engaged in the business founded 107 years ago.

The code of service established by the first Robert Creighton

has in the succeeding years become a tradition, rigidly maintained but improving with the march of modern progress.

Today, the service is of the most modern description, and the establishment is the largest in any country town of the Commonwealth. Its plant is equal to anything in the cities.

There are two modern motor hearses and a new Chrysler chassis has recently been purchased for a third hearse.

The Casket Factory, built by R. H. Creighton Snr., in 1910, is still is use, but it is intended at an opportune time to build a The Chapel,- which forms part of a new, modern building in

Mann Street, Gosford, is dignified yet simple in its architectural style. When conditions warrant, additional Chapels are to be built at The Entrance, Wyong and at Woy Woy.

Today, the service covers the Brisbane Water District and funerals are conducted to all parts of the State. There are representatives in all the capital cities of the Commonwealth.

In order to further extend and improve the service, the firm was recently incorporated under the Co’mpanies Act, with ( Mr R. H. Creighton, who has had extensive experience both ‘ here and in other parts of the State, as Managing Director.

Incorporation will ensure the continuity of operations and the tradition of service will be maintained in the years to come.

RH CREIGHTON

CENTRAL COAST FUNERAL SERVICE PTY LTD

rock of ages

The stone of a girl clinging to a cross is quite a common one in the mid century, called “Rock of Ages”, there are examples of it at Waverley, Rookwood and Northern Suburbs Cemetery’s.

Robert Baker

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Church of England Section 1  Row 6  Grave 125

Robert Baker

The Public Life these news articles refer to is he was the District’s Coroner up until his death and the position was then taken by William E. Kirkness.

Had there been any deaths by accident in the area from 1916 to 1925, the graves in this cemetery would have been attended by Robert Baker, in his role as Coroner.

The news articles about all these deaths would have been written by him or his journalists for his paper. He had been dead for four years when is son died in 1929, at Terrigal Byron ”Sonny” Baker who is mentioned in an earlier blog post.

9th December 1920

In honor of her approaching marriage Miss Zoe Mason was entertained at a ‘White Tea’ ^ Mrs. A. I. Chapman’s residence on Wednesday afternoon, 1st instant. There was a large gathering oi ladies, including members of the Orchestral Society.

The Mason’s had a son Lance, brother of Zoe, who was referred to who is mentioned in an earlier blog post for Cecil Morris the Policeman’s son in his final letter to the newspaper in 1915. Bakers journalist’s mind had the foresight to get these young boys writing to him for his paper getting first hand accounts of the Great War.Zoe ‘s father was a local magistrate, J. J. Mason, and the family lived in Point Frederick in a house named “Waterville”.

Zoe married Robert Baker in 1920. This is the sort of wedding write up if you happen to own the paper.

 

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9th December 1920

Wedding Bells.        BAKER— MASON.

Yesterday afternoon the wedding of Mr. Robert J. Baker, President of the Erina Shire Council, and Proprietor and Editor of the Gosford Times, ‘ ‘ with Miss Zoe Mason, daughter of Mr. and Mr. J. J. Mason, ‘ Waterville,  Gosford, was solemnised in the Sacristy of the Roman Catholic Church, Gosford, Rev. Father John Kelly officiating.

Though heavy rain was falling throughout the day and whilst the ceremony was in progress, a large gathering of the public was present in the church.

Both bride and bridegroom being very popular in the district. The bride looked particularly charming in a white crepe-de-chene wedding dress, with deep flounces of white georgette, edged -with seed pearls. A tunic ornamented with jewelled trimming was worn, and the beautiful veil of Brussels net and hand-embroidered Honiton point, arranged in Juliet cap fashion, trimmed with orange buds, was loaned by Mrs. Guy Parr and looked strikingly effective. Given away by her father, the bride was attended by her sister, Miss Marie Mason, as brides maid, who wore a pale blue crepede cuene frock dra*ped fashion, with trim mings of pale pink georgette, and picture hat of similar shades, trimmed with fruit and flowers. The bride’s mother was gowned in amethyst georgette and crepe-de-chene, brocaded tunic, with floral hat to match.

Mr. Fred C. Warmoll acted in the capacity of Best man. The gift of the bride groom to the bride was a handsome diamond pendant set in platinum and a beautiful bouquet of lilies of the valley.

The gift to the bridesmaid was a gold bangle, also a shower bouquet of pale pink carnations.

Whilst the register was being signed, Miss Ursula Mason, sister of the bride, and Gosford ‘s prima donna delighted those present in. A perfect rendering of the exquisite ‘Beloved it is Morn,’ and as the happy couple left the church, the Wedding March, played on the organ by

Mrs. Passlow, sped them cheerily on their way. Mr. and Mrs. Mason entertained relatives and a few near friends fort a sumptuous breakfast at ‘Waterville,’ East Gosford, where the usual toasts were most enthusiastically honoured.  

The door attendant was kept busily engaged in receiving telegraphic despatches wishing the ,-newly-united pair the happiness they deserve, and after an inspection by the guests of the many valuable gifts received, the party accompanied Mr. and . Mrs. Baker to the railway’ station where much merriment and good feeling prevailed.

The train on, leaving ; the’ station discharged a royal salute of detonators which had been placed on the line, and to the accompaniment of loud cheering, much confetti, and joyous ‘ ‘ Cockadoodle dooing’ from the engine, the happy couple left for Sydney on a few weeks’

honeymoon in the mountain country, carrying with them the best wishes of the whole of the district.

The bride travelled in a charming frock of champagne georgette and crepe-de-chene, accordion pleated, and embroidered in latest pastel shades, and wore a pretty little French hat of Henna and champagne trimmed with fruit and streamers. Amongst the presents noticed

was the handsome plate consisting of a charming rose-bowl and set of entree and cake dishes, the gift of ninety of Mr. Baker’s friends.

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A short five years later Robert dies leaving Zoe Mason/Baker becomes a widow.

5th Dec 1925

 Aged 51 Newspaper publisher.

10th December 1925

TRIBUTES

TO THE LATE MR. R. J. BAKER.

AN APPRECIATION BY MR.

W. E. KIRKNESS.

As one who has been closely. associated with Robert Baker in most public affairs since his arrival in Gosford, 16 years ago, I wish to add my tribute to his worth as a friend and a citizen.

He had his limitations, and acknowledged them, but we can well afford to let any shortcomings of his fade into the past of our forgetfulness, because our own faults are ever before us. His virtues and generosity were of a high standard, and over stood for the advancement of his fellowmen, and of this town and district in particular.

The journal that he conducted -was clean in principle, broad in sympathy, and progressive in character. He will be missed and mourned by the whole of the district.

His death means a personal loss to many of us. I know of many persons who, in time of need have financially helped him, and he never went back on a friend. These arc the qualities that lift men above .their faults, and exalt the remembrance of their life and name into a sweet experience.

10th December 1925

The Passing of R. J. Baker.

Widespread Mourning.

Popular Pressman and

Respected Public Man.

 After an illness which caused him suffering over a long period, Robert James Baker passed from this life, in Lewisham Private Hospital, in the very early hours of Saturday morning last.

The very best of medical skill had been called upon, but the doctors were powerless to avert the cruel fate which took from this community, and from the State at large, one of its most valued

citizens, when he had spent most of the half-century of his life in strenuous work, but before he could enjoy any of the ease he had so thoroughly earned.

His passing has been a blow keenly felt by all sections of the community. Robert James Baker was a man who never spared himself, in the common tasks of his business or in the service of the public. And he was a man who never turned down I a genuine plea for help. The result of a life lived on those principles was seen on Monday, when a whole district turned out to pay a last mark of respect to its most esteemed citizen, and to I

mark deep sympathy with those who have been cruelly bereaved by his death. Mr. Robert James Baker has gone, more’s the pity. But the work that he has done for Gosford— and for the districts-will I never die.

.The late Mr. Baker, who was born at Hill End on the 8th August, 1874,

was the only son of the late Mi- Henry Baker, of Hill Bad and Emmaville. He served his apprenticeship on the Emmaville ‘Argus,’ and at an early age displayed exceptional ability both as a practical printer and all-round journalist. At the age of 21 he was engaged by the late Dr. Ross, M.L.A., to man age the Molong ‘Argus,’ which in a few months he acquired as his own property.

He conducted this paper with very great success for nearly ten years, eventually selling it to the Hon. J. C. L. Fitzpatrick, M.L.A. Mr. Baker then purchased the Peak Hill ‘Express,’ which he speedily trans formed into one of the best weeklies in the Central West. During his period (four years) of residence in Peak Hill lie took a very active part in public matters.

He was secretary of the Agricultural and Pastoral Association, Secretary of the Jockey Club, and of the Curra Amateur Race Club. On his leaving Peak Hill he was publicly entertained by town and district residents and presented with a gold watch (suit ably inscribed), and massive gold and belt.  After disposing of his Peak Hill paper, the subject of this sketch enjoyed a well-earned six months holiday.

He then, just sixteen years ago, ‘acquired the ‘Gosford Times,’ which wry quickly  evidenced that dynamic energy which had always characterised his work as a pressman.  A few years ago Mr. Baker established the ‘Woy Woy Herald,’ and both papers were under his sole control up to his death. The late Mr. Baker was one of the foundation members of the New South Wale- Country Press Association. He was a member of the Executive for some 20 years, a Vice-President for three years, and President for two terms in 1920-22.

For many years he was a director of the Country Press Co operative Company of Australia, Ltd., and also n Vice-President of the Australian Provincial Press Association. Of the 300 members of the Country Press Association, none had displayed more well-directed activity in the affairs of the Association, and no member was more highly esteemed or will be more misled than Mr. R. J. Baker.

The late Mr. Baker was twice married. In 1902, He was married to Miss Margaret Black, of Forbes, to whom four children were born — Misses Thelma. Edna, and Lola, and Mr Henry

Georgia Baker. His first wife died in 1917. and in 1920 he married Miss Zoe Mason, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Mason, of Gosford, who, with three little children, survive him.

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Here is a brief history of the Gosford Times after Robert J Baker died.
14 December 1954
When the late Robert James Baker in 1913 erected the two-storey brick building at 144-146 Mann Street, Gosford, he no doubt believed that he was establishing here
the permanent home of “The Gosford Times.”
After his death, the property and the paper were purchased by Mr. Stanley Kings
bury, who converted the building into two shops and erected a fibro and weather
board building at the rear to house the paper.
Now the property of P. J. Palmer & Son Pty. Ltd., the original building has been
modernised ‘and extended to provide a large menswear store for the city company —
one of its many branches in NSW.
The next move, so far as “The Gosford Times” is concerned, will be to a new two-
storey brick building, now in course of construction at 1 35 Mann Street, Gosford. This is planned to take place in 1 April 1955.
 This Scribe

 

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