Dumbrell

Randel William Dumbrell and Family Methodist Section 1 Row 4 Plot 18

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Dumbrell

Stonework and the name Dumbrell have been associated in Australia since Arthur Phillip’ times. Randel Dumbrell was a fifth generation mason and had trained his only child, Raymond in the trade.

BANK maitland

Randel worked for his father Stephen Dumbrell on a number of buildings in the upper hunter and Newcastle areas. He was the clerk of works on St Mary’y Church in Maitland in 1890. His handy work as a monumental mason is also present in Sandgate Cemetery. His workmanship is present on some of the earliest graves in this cemetery.

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Dumbrell’s workshop was in Erina Street Gosford and he worked closely with Maynard Wright the quarry master at Gosford Quarries.

Examples of his work around Gosford include the stone work at Burns park near the railway station and the stone wall at the far end of Mann Street (up near the War Memorial site) that was once the residence of Dr Fielder.

COURT HOUSE

After the death of his son Raymond in a shooting accident and then coupled with the loss of his good friend Maynard Wright (heart attack), he was subsumed with grief and turned to drink.

This family grave looks finished but for the grave of a master mason you know it was a work in progress that is incomplete. There are no headstones for any of the family members contained in here Raymond (1936), Randel (1945) and Maybel his wife (1954) and the family business had been drunken away.

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10 April 1934

Unreturned Licenses

For failing to return his certificate Of registration and number plate, Raymond C. Dumbrell was fined 10/, with 5/6 costs, at Gosford Court last Friday.

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Sydney Morning herald

29 January 1936

MAN FATALLY SHOT.

Companion’s Long Run for Aid.

GOSFORD, Tuesday.

Raymond Clyde Dumbrell, 31 of Mann-street, Gosford, was found in a pile of rocks In open country near Gloucester on Sunday, with a shotgun wound In his right leg, and he died In hospital yesterday morning.

A shotgun was found nearby.

Dumbrell, In company with Ernest Stephenson, Patrick Waters, and John Poster, of Gosford, and Roy Pile, of Stratford, was spending the week-end on a shooting trip in the bush near Gloucester. He had separated from the party earlier in the day, and when found he was bleeding in an alarming manner from the wound In his leg.

Efforts were made to stop the flow of blood, and Stephenson was sent for help. He ran seven miles through the bush to Patrick Keegan’s camp, and drove in Keegan’s car to Gloucester.

A doctor was picked up and conveyed back to the scene of the accident. Dumbrell was then taken to a hospital in Gloucester, where he died at 2 o’clock next morning. He leaves a wife and four children.

From the position of the gun found near the Injured man, it is believed that he had shot at something, and, In going forward a few steps, stumbled on a rock, the gun falling butt foremost on another rock and striking the hammer against the unexploded cartridge.

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Family Notices

17 May 1949

DUMBRELL.— In loving memory of Randel William, who passed away, May 16, 1945.

In silence we remember.

Inserted by his wife.

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27 January 1950

DUMBRELL.

— In loving memory of my dear son, Raymond Clyde, accidentally killed January 27,

1936

 

16 May 1950

DUMBRELL— Treasured memories of my dear husband, Randel William, who passed away May 16, 1945.

Always remembered by his wife.

 

6 October 1954

OBITUARY

Mrs. M. E DUMBBELL

Mrs. Mabel Ella Dumbrell, of Gosford, died in Newcastle on October 2 at the age of 75 years. The funeral left Mr. R. H. Creighton’s private chapel on Tuesday. proceeding to Point Clare Cemetery.

Mrs. Durabrell is the widow of the late Mr R. W. Dumbrell, formerly a monumental mason of Gosford.

 

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Scotts

Robert Donald Scott Church Of England Section 1 Row 1 Plot 6

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The Scott Family.

23 November 1916

Death of Miss Scott.

Miss Sarah Maria Scott, who died at her residence, Point Clare, on Thurs

day last, was 83 years of age, and was the second daughter of the late Mr,

Thomas  A. Scott, after whom the railway platform, ‘Tascott,’ is named.

The funeral took place on Saturday, the remains being interred in the

Church of England portion of the new cemetery at Point Clare.

Rev. A. Renwick, Rector of Christ Church, conducted the burial service, and

Messrs. Creighton & Sons had charge of the mortuary arrangements.

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Robert Scott, another of T.A. Scott’s sons was making a living running a holiday home at the former family home called Waterview  (it was situated on the small hillock near Tascott railway station, now called Waterveiw Place). When this happened.

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16 December 1920

Railway Fatality at Tascott.

DEATH OF MR. R. D. SCOTT.

It is with deep regret that we have to record the death of Mr. Robert Donald Scott, an old resident of Tascott, which occurred in tragic circumstances on Friday last. Deceased left his home that morning and was returning from over the line about mid-day while the storm was at its height. As the roads were impassible he was compelled to traverse the railway line and was walking between the rails when overtaken by the Brisbane express bound for Sydney. Death must have been instantaneous. The accident was not noticed by the driver or fireman of the train. The tragic circumstances surrounding Mr. Scott’s death are heightened by the fact that hi§ son was standing on the verandah of his home and witnessed the accident which he was powerless to avert.

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At the inquest held at Gosford on Monday last a verdict of accidental death was returned. The late Mr. Scott was one of the oldest residents of the Brisbane Water district and was beloved and respected by all who came in contact with him. He was a son of the late Thomas Alison Scott, who was the original grantee of the land surrounding Point Clare and Tascott. He leaves a widow and one son, Mr. Thomas William Scott, who reside at Tascott. Two sisters, the Misses Martha and Jane Scott, reside at Point Clare, and another sister, Mrs. Annie Herbert, is at present in England, while his brothers are Messrs Archibald Scott, of Point Clare, and James William Scott, of Marrickville.

The funeral took place on Sunday at the Point Clare cemetery, the Rev. Arthur Renwick conducting the burial service.

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Jane Scott was one other of the many children of Thomas A. Scott. To which whom the suburb TASCOTT is named after. Having lived all her life in the Brisbane Water district, she clearly was not coping with the move to a nursing home in Sydney, decides to escape.

22 February 1923

ACCIDENTAL DEATH.

A verdict of accidental death was returned by the Sydney Coroner, when he held an inquiry into the death of Miss Jane Scott, aged 81, who until recently resided at Point Clare. , Deceased was an inmate of the Nursing Home at Petersham, but appeared to be discontented, and on January 15, during the temporary absence of the matron, she apparently climbed over the balcony rail and slid down the verandah post to within a few feet of the ground, when she fell. She died on February 15 from her injuries.  

22 October 1931

Death of Miss Martha Scott The death of the nonagenarian Miss Scott, which occurred on Oct. 11, and which was referred to in our last issue, recalls a number of interesting facts in connection ‘with the early history of the Brisbane Water district.

Her father, the late Thomas Scott, was the first man to grow sugar cane in Australia. He commenced its cultivation at Port Macquarie, and later, when he went to reside at Point Clare, he grew cane there, but soil and climatic conditions proved unsuitable. As the pioneer of the sugar industry in Australia, the Government granted Thomas Scott a pension. He was then a man of advanced age, but he continued to draw the pension until his death at the age of 105 years. His wife, Annie Scott, also died at the age of 105.

They reared a large family of 7 daughters and 5 sons. Three of their children are still living. They are Annie (Mrs. Herbert), who is in England; Mr. Archibald Scott (Point Clare), and Mr. James William Scott (Woy Woy). Strange is the fact that four of the family passed away on October 16, and all at Point Clare.There are 7 of the 12, of Thomas Allison Scott’s children buried here at Point Clare Cemetery, they are, Sarah, Jane, Robert, Martha, James, Harriet and Archibald.

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Robert Donald Scott.

AN APPRECIATION.

On Friday, December 10, As the result of a train accident near his home and railway station, Tascott, there passed away one of the best known pioneers of Brisbane Water — Robert Donald Scott,

Born in the district where he had lived tor over sixty-eight years, Mr. Scott was probably one of the most widely-respected residents. To know him was to love him. The present writer has had the privilege of acquaintance with him for twenty years and of appreciating his sterling qualities. Of quiet and retiring character, ho nevertheless possessed shrewd judgment and business faculty in his dealings, but his kindliness of disposition and unswerving honesty of purpose, combined with a wholesome sense of humor endeared him to all with whom Le came in contact. It may be said ‘truthfully that he made no enemies, oven among those with whom he was not always in agreement

For a man of his years he accomplished more in the way of daily work than is usually done by many much younger men. Methodical habits and consistent energy, aided by a sound mind in a sound body, were the secret of this. He lived the simple life, carefully conserved the blessing of health which was bestowed upon him, and tried to do all the good he could in passing through life.

This outlook and object are surely noble, but with Robert Scott they were faithfully adhered to, and brought to him great peace of mind and contentment.

The late Mr. Scott came of excellent family, of Scotch descent. As most residents of the district  now, his father, Thomas Allison Scott, was the first Clerk of Petty Sessions at Brisbane Water, and a man who made rely markable efforts early last century to J establish sugar-growing in New South Wales.

For his w ork in this direction honor to his memory has been accorded recently by the Royal Agricultural  Society of N.S.W. He lived to the age of 105 years, and lies buried in the old cemetery at Point Frederick, Gosford.

His uncle was Sir James Scott, Admiral in the Royal Navy, and other members of his father’s family were distinguished in mercantile pursuits.

His mother came from England as a child, and after her marriage lived at Point Clare for over seventy years, dying at the mature age of 93.

Two brothers, Archibald and William, and three sisters survive him. Two of the latter, the Misses Martha and Jane Scott, have been resident at Point Clare for many years; the other sister married Dr. Herbert, and was once resident in Gosford, but has been long away from Australia.

The late Robert Scott spent the earlier years of his life at the place of his birth. In his thirties he went to y. the metropolis, and for a time engaged in business. While there he also married. His native hills called to him, however, and he soon returned to Point Clare, where Mrs. Scott established, and developed to a wonderful degree, the boarding-house so long known as Waterview, a name very familiar to holiday-seekers throughout  the length and breadth of the State.

This famous house of accommodation, although Mrs. Scott retired from its management some years ago, remained in its old location until twelve months since, when unfortunately it was destroyed by fire. It was to serve the needs of this house that the Tascott platform was erected by the Railway Commissioners, the name being derived from the initials and surname of Mr.

Scott’s father. (T.A.Scott).

Mr. Robert Scott is survived by his Wife and son, who live near the old house.

The areas of the surrounding were his property, and at the time of his death he was actively engaged in preparing for sale a sub division, including the ‘Waterview’ property.

In closing this sketch, which it is? is all too imperfect to do justice sterling worth of its subject, what I write desires to record a profound sense of deprivation, both to himself and to the district, by the untimely removal of one who, had he been would have continued in the paths of large-hearted kindliness so lovingly followed, by him in the past.

His labors here have ended, and he is at rest, and so who remain are the

poorer by the loss of his benevolent and beneficient personality from amongst us, but his good works and legacy will not be readily forgotten by those who knew him, and will serve as his lasting memorial.

maria burt

21July 1916

Obituary.

Mrs Burt, aged 77 years, passed away at the residence of her only daughter, Mrs Archie Scott, West Gosford, at 9 o’clock on Saturday night.

Deceased lady was the relict of the late Sydney Burt, who in the early days, was a Sydney lawyer and also developed into a prominent business man, doing a large trade in shipping horses to India. It is related that on one occasion he shipped over 200 head and did not insure them. The first night after their departure he dreamt that he saw the vessel wrecked and the horses drowned.

Next morning he went to an insurance office and insured the horses. Sure enough two days later the Shine was wrecked at the very place Burt dreamt about, and not a horse was saved. Mr. Burt spent some years in Fiji, and during his career made, speculated, and lost three fortunes.

The late Mrs. Burt was a resident of Gosford for about ten years, and had been- ailing for the past three months. The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon, the remains being interred in Point Clare cemetery.

Rev, A. Renwick read the burial service.

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Alfred Bennett Church of England Section 8 Row 20 Plot 1

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18 August 1953

TRAGIC DEATH OF ORCHARDIST

 Late last Saturday afternoon, Alfred Hilton Bennett, 51 years, a well known Mangrove Mountain orchardist, was found dead, with a gunshot wound in the region of his heart.

 The tragedy occurred on his property, about half a mile from his home. There are no suspicious circumstances, state Gosford police.

 Detective Cox, who carried out an investigation, was told that at about 2.30 pm Mr Bennett informed his wife and elder son that he was going to take a walk down to the cauliflower patch and would take his dog and gun with him as he might get a rabbit on the way.

The son left half an hour later to play tennis and when he returned about 5.30, he found that his father was still away from home. The son went in search of his father and eventually found his body on a bush track with a double barrelled shotgun lying beside him.

From an investigation on the spot. Detective Cox believes that Mr Bennett tripped over a fallen tree across the track and in his fall one barrel of the gun was accidentally discharged.

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The subsequent Inquest found,

11 September 1953

ORCHARPIST SHOT NEAR HOME TRAGIC DISCOVERY OF BODY BY HIS SON

A son who went looking for his orchardist father at Mangrove Mt on August 15 found him dead, victim of the accidental discharge of a 12-gauge shotgun.

The District Coroner (Mr. C. J. Staples) returned this finding at a Magisterial inquiry at Gosford on Wednesday into the death of Alfred Hilton Bennett, 51, of Wiseman’s Ferry Road, Mangrove Mt. evidence at the inquiry disclosed that on August 15, Bennett left his home at 2.30 pm, accompanied by his dog.

He took the shot-gun with him, telling his wife he intended shooting a rabbit for the dog. When he did not return by 5 pm, his son, William, went to look for him.

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 TRIPPED ON LOG

The son found his father’s body about 300 yards from the house with a gunshot wound in the chest. Const. K. A. Rhodes, of Gosford police, said Bennett I had apparently tripped on a log, discharging the gun when he fell.

Bennett’s widow. Iris Melba Bennett, told the Coroner that Bennett had had no financial or domestic worries. ‘The home was as happy as could be wished for,’ she added.

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Riley

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Keith (aka Mickey) Riley Presbyterian Section 1 Row 7 Plot 21

10th January 1950

YOUTH NOT SENT TO HOSPITAL

Bed Shortage, Says Doctor At Inquiry.

Although ill enough, a young man injured in an accident had not been taken to hospital because of the shortage of beds, according to a doctor at a Magisterial Inquiry at Gosford Court House on Saturday.

The inquiry was into the death on December 17 of Keith William Riley, of Booker Bay, who was injured in a motor-cycle accident early the previous morning.

Dr. George Craig Duncan, of Gosford, said at the inquiry that he had seen Riley at his surgery at about midday on December 16. He then appeared to be suffering from concussion.

Dr. Duncan said that he treated Riley and had told him to return home, go to bed, and lie flat. He had also told him to report his condition to him in several hours.

Later that afternoon relatives had reported by telephone that Riley was vomiting.

Dr. Duncan said he had ordered Riley’s admission to the Gosford District Hospital.

SHORTAGE OF BEDS

In reply to questions by the District Coroner, Mr. C. J. Staples, Dr. Duncan said:

‘When I first saw Riley, I thought he was ill enough to require admission to hospital for observation, but owing to the acute shortage of hospital beds, it was necessary to observe him at his home for several hours. ‘His people were instructed by me direct to observe certain symptoms, if present, and report them, at once to me. ‘They did so. ‘In my opinion, the cause of death was due to extensive subdural haematoma. There would be a fracture of the skull, in all probability.

‘An X-ray examination would have disclosed the fracture of the skull. I did not at first consider that there was a fracture present.

‘I consider that this boy had all the treatment that could have been given to him in the circumstances.’ The Coroner found that Riley had died at the Gosford District Hospital on December 17 from injuries accidentally received when he fell from his motor-cycle on the Pacific Highway at Niagara Park about 12.30 am on December 16.

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Dillon

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John Dillon Presbyterian Section 1 Row 4 Plot 11

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John Dillon

23 August 1940

THREE KILLED IN TUNNEL

Whole Gang Struck by

Freight Train

Four Seriously Injured Three men were killed in an accident in the Woy Woy railway tunnel yesterday afternoon. Four others were seriously injured.

DEAD

John Dillon, 37, married, of South Woy Woy.

Michael Shelley, 47, married, of Punchbowl.

Leonard Munce, 44, married, of Paddington.

INJURED

Reginald L, Mason, 28, married, of Adamstown;

William Whitten, 31, married, of ‘ Cardiff;

 Andrew J. Blackie, 41, married, of West Maitland;

Angus Blakely, 43, married, of West Wallsend.

They were struck by a north bound freight train 30 chains (A chain is approx. the length of a cricket pitch) from the northern end of the tunnel.

Those killed received frightful injuries. The fireman and driver of the train did not know the

accident had occurred until they were informed by the stationmaster at Woy Woy who stopped the train following a telephone message from the tunnel.

Working

A cap and a hat were found on the front of the engine. For months now, two hundred maintenance employees have been camped near the northern entrance to the Woy Woy tunnel. They have been engaged on laying new rails through the tunnel, which is a mile and 10 chains in length.

The men have been working under dangerous conditions every day in the tunnel and the constant strain shows clearly on their faces. They’re poor men, with wives and children, and they get an extra 6d. each day to compensate them for the danger of the work they do.

Yesterday, the seven members of the ‘muck’ gang ate an early lunch, shouldered their picks and shovels, picked up their acetylene lanterns and marched off into the inky depths of the tunnel.

Ganger Shelley, who was one of the men killed, set the men to work near the middle of the tunnel. A drain was being repaired, cement being mixed on a board. No one knows exactly what happened after that.

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Shortly after 1 p.m. a gang under a man named Kennedy, entered the tunnel from the Woy Woy end. A flag-man stationed at the entrance blew his whistle to give warning of an approaching train, and the men hastened into the tiny alcoves that are spaced at about 2 -chain intervals along the walls of the tunnel. (First Train).

A train thundered by and they moved out. From the other end of the tunnel came another train. Again the men dived for their alcoves as it thundered by. (Second train).

Some minutes later the men again took to the alcoves as another train went thundering through. Thinking the way was clear, the men again emerged from the holes in the wall and followed on. (Third train).

Suddenly, from up ahead, they heard the rumble of another train. Someone yelled , ‘Go for your

lives! She’s broken in two and the end’s coming back towards us!’

Panic took -hold of the gang.

There was a terrific clatter of shovels and smashing wood and men’s cries.

One . man threw himself down in the slush of the gutter alongside the rails; another fought his way to an alcove; another dashed madly back towards the opening of the tunnel; another jumped across to the opposite set of rails only to be hurled clear as he was truck by the side of one of the trucks of the fourth train.

 

He fell back into the space between the rails, but was not injured.

As the roar of the receding train died away, the men heard moans and cries for help coming from further along the tunnel. Their lights had been smashed in the panic, with the exception of two small lanterns. In the beams of these they saw a gruesome scene.

Every member of the ‘muck’ gang had been struck by the engine of the fourth train. One of the

men was decapitated, another was  so dreadfully mangled as to be almost unrecognizable.

The injured men were lying about everywhere. One, with blood streaming down his face, was vainly attempting to claw his way along on his stomach; another 4 lay very still in the blue metal at the side of the. track; others were strewn around. None had escaped.

The Brisbane Water District Ambulance was summoned from Gosford by telephone. Two ambulance wagons raced to the nearest point to the tunnel. Woy Woy Police and Dr. Delepine, of Woy Woy, arrived at the same time.

Constable L. B. Browne, of the Woy Woy Police, led the rescuers into the tunnel where the four injured men’s mates were lifting the injured onto rail trolleys. They were quickly brought out and along the railway line to a point where the Woy Woy-Gosford Road crosses the creek. Here they were lifted on to stretchers and carried down the steep bank into a waiting ambulance which rushed them through to Gosford and thence to Newcastle Hospital.

The three bodies were recovered from the tunnel later and taken to the Woy Woy morgue where they were identified to the District Coroner by Thomas Abbotson, of Ryde, a member of one of the gangs.

Work in the tunnel was suspended for the day, with the exception of one small gang which went back to make sure that the permanent way was safe for other trains.

An inquest will be held when the injured men recover.

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Victor J. Mackenzie

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Methodist Section 1 Row 1 Plot 22

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Victor J. Mackenzie

Victor Joseph Mackenzie was a Man about this Town. He mixed in elite circles and was a go to guy for many of the upcoming Council politicians. He was a big strong man , an ordardist and would have known the Adcock’s He participated as a strike breaking action to load oranges onto ships. He knew Robert Baker, he went to Robert Baker’s men’s gathering just before his wedding in 1920 and Baker to his wedding in 1922. He had a wife Thyra and many children. The Train accident would have had a lasting impact on Victor. His mate Robert Baker would normally have been the Coroner, I note that W. E. Kirkness is in his place.

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Gosford Times and  Wyong Advocate

Dated 13 January 1921.

WOY WOY BRIDGE DISASTER.

 Coroner’s Inquests Accidental Deaths

Railway Officials Exonerated.

On Monday morning last, at Gosford Courthouse, the District Coroner, Mr. W. E. Kirkness, J.P., held an inquest regarding the recent Woy Woy Bridge  disaster, which resulted in the deaths of Mrs. Victor McKenzie and her two children, and Mr. C. W. Roughley. The  following evidence was adduced: —    

James Lewis Russell deposed: I am  a police constable stationed at Woy  Woy; I remember the 3rd instant; at about 6.30 p.m. I received a message by telephone from Mr. P. Gillan ; I hurried to the Railway Bridge, Woy Woy; Constable Young, of Newcastle, was also  present; I there saw on the Railway  Bridge the body of a man apparently  the age of 36 years, a boy of about 9years; I also saw the mangled remains of a woman; from inquiries I made I believe that train No. E74 Gosford to Sydney, had just previously run them down and killed them; I also believe  that there was a baby 2 and a half years missing from the party; with the assistance of persons present, I conveyed the bodies to one of Mr. W. J. Parks ‘ cottages close by; next day, about 10 a.m., the body of a female child about 2 and a half  years was found at Mt. Pleasant washed  up on the shore; this was conveyed by  the police and placed with the other bodies in Mr. Parks’ cottage; Mt. Pleasant is about two miles away from the scene of the accident; I have reason  to believe that the body of the child found was one of the party; I have reason to believe that it fell through the  [sleepers of the Bridge into the water below.      

By Inspector Haslam: I believe that there are notices at both ends of the Bridge warning persons against crossing.

Victor Joseph McKenzie deposed: I  am a property owner and reside at Gosford; I remember 3rd instant; the members of my family left home on that date to join Mr. Roughley and his family at Woy Woy; they consisted of my wife, Thyra McKenzie, 42,Edna May, 15 years, Harold John, 8 years, Bruce, 4 years, and Gladys Jean, 2 and a half years; they were all in good health; that was the last time I saw my wife, Thyra, my son Harold, and my daughter  Gladys; their lives were not insured; they did not leave any property.

William Rudland Hawkins deposed :I am an orchardist and reside at Dural; I remember the 3rd day of January ;the deceased, Clifton Wilmott  Roughley was my son-in-law; I last saw  him alive about a fortnight previously;  he went to Woy Woy in company with  his wife and family for a holiday; they  rented a cottage from Mr. W. J. Parks; they were joined by Mrs. McKenzie and  her children; I went to Woy Woy on  the 3rd, and to the cottage occupied by Mr. Roughley; I there saw the bodies of Clifton Wilmott  Roughley, Thyra  McKenzie, Harold McKenzie, and later  the body of Gladys McKenzie; I identfied the bodies of the four persons mentioned; I understand the reason the  party proceeded to Woy Woy by foot  along the line instead of going by boat was the rough weather conditions.

I know that they were run down by the  train while crossing the Bridge; Mr.  Roughley ‘s life was insured in the Colonial Mutual Insurance Office for| about £900; He left a will leaving his wife executrix, and Reginald Roughley  trustee; he was a total abstainer.  Alfred Harold Wilcockson deposed.

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I am an engine driver, and employed by the Railway Commissioners; I remember  the 3rd January; I was in charge of train No. E74; I took up duty at Gosford at 4.15 p.m.; I left Gosford at 6.35;  we stopped at Point Clare, Tascott, and Koolewong; we were travelling at about 30 miles an hour; the first intimation I had of anything wrong was the fireman blowing his whistle; the train was then just coming out of the cutting; we were  then about 75 yards from the Woy Woy Bridge;

I immediately cut off steam  when the whistle was sounded as I felt there was danger ahead when the fireman blew the whistle; the fireman said there is someone on the Bridge ; I    looked ahead and saw several people on the Bridge; I at once applied the air    brakes with full force, and reversed the engine; this had the effect of bringing he train to a standstill at about three  cars past the bridge; from the time of applying the brakes the train pulled up within its own length ; I met the guard  coming toward me; he said “we have killed three people”; he said that they were all dead; I then went back to the  engine, and got my detonators and gave  them to the fireman and told him to go and protect the down line by placing detonators on the line; I told him then to proceed to Woy, Woy Station and in form the Station Master of what had occurred; I then got on the engine and moved the trains to allow the guard to take the remains from under the train .

The weather was stormy and raining ;the whistle is a deep toned and strong one, and should have been heard at the Bridge; part of the train was still on the Bridge when I pulled up; the mileage is 45 miles 65 chains; the time of the accident was 6.46 p.m.; when I saw the people on the Bridge. They seemed too confused to get out of the way.

William Thomas Wallace deposed: I am employed by the Railway Commissioners; I remember the 3rd day of January; I was fireman on Train E 74 on that day; the No. of the engine is909; we left Koolewong about 6.42 p.m. the next stop would be Woy Woy; before reaching the Woy Woy Bridge there is a long cutting and a curve; I had a clear view ahead after leaving the cutting; it is about 75 yards from the end of the cutting to the Bridge; I saw several people walking on the Bridge; I at once blew the engine whistle, and thought the people would get off the Bridge;  I called to the driver and told him, and he at once applied the brakes and reversed the engine; this brought the train to a standstill suddenly about three cars past the Bridge; there were also several cars on the bridge; the driver got off the engine and went back the left me in charge of the engine while he did so; he came back and informed me that the train had run over three people and killed them; I was sent to Woy Woy to report the matter; the train was travelling about 30 miles an hour; the driver used every means possible to avert the accident.

Robert Alexander Lindsay deposed: I am employed by the Railway Commissioners as a guard; I remember the 3rdday of January; I was guard on TrainE74 on that day; the train left Koolewong at 6.45 p.m.; when in the cutting before reaching Woy Woy Bridge I heard a blast from the engine; I had no clear view of the line; I heard another whistle, and a few seconds afterwards the brakes were applied with full force; I immediately applied the hand brakes; the train pulled up; I jumped on to the Bridge; I heard a boy calling out “Dadda, Dadda” on the Bridge; I also saw Mr. Roughley ‘s body lying on the down line, also the body of a boy and the body of a woman; the body of the boy was between the two lines and the body of the woman was under the train about the 4th or 5thcar from the engine; I then went forward and informed the driver that three persons had been killed, and to send the fireman to report the matter to Woy Woy and to protect the opposite line on his way; I do not know the span of the Bridge; it is possible for a child to fall between the sleepers into the water below; I satisfied myself that life was extinct when I saw the bodies; I set the train back a few yards to allow the bodies to be removed.

The Coroner returned the following verdict : — “I find that the said Clifton Wilmott Roughley,  Thyra McKenzie, Harold John McKenzie, Gladys Jean McKenzie, at Woy Woy, Police District of Brisbane Water, N.S.W., on January 3rd,1921, died from injuries accidentally received on that date through being struck by a passing train, no blame being attachable to the train officials.”

thyra

Victor remarried in about a years time.
16th February 1922
McKENZIE— WHITE.
A wedding was celebrated at St. Anne’s Church of England, Strathfield, on Saturday afternoon last, when the Rector, Rev. Rose, joined together in holy wedlock, Mr. Victor J. McKenzie and Miss Lydia White, daughter of Mr
and Mrs. R. J. White, of ‘Khandallah,’ Strathfield. Both were former residents of
Gosford, and the ceremony was witnessed by a number of Gosford friends and relatives. The bride, who was given away by her father, Mr. R. J. White, was attired in a grey tailored costume, hat to match, and carried a lovely bouquet of white carnations, cactus dahlias and asparagus fern, the gift of the bridegroom.
Mr. E. K. White acted as groomsman. The bridegroom’s gift to the bride was
a diamond and torquoise ring, whilst the bride’s gift to the bridegroom was
an inscribed gold watch. After the ceremony, an adjournment was made
to ‘Khandallah,’ the residence of the bride’s parents, where the reception was held, and the health of the bride and bridegroom, proposed by Mr. Baker, President of Erina Shire, was enthusiastically honored, and acknowledged by the bridegroom. Among the wedding guests were Mr. and Mrs. William Burns, of Homebush, old time residents of Gosford, Mr. Burns driving the bridal party to and from St. Anne’s in his motor car. Later in the afternoon the newly-wedded couple motored to the Mountains on the honey moon trip. The wedding presents were numerous and costly, including a handsome case of cutlery, the gift of Gosford friends. The future home of Mr. and Mrs. McKenzie will be in Burwood.

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So fast forward a couple of years and Victor is back in the Gosford area and  has become an action man and He is attempting to drive his Buick Six over the ridgeline to Woy Woy the first bloke to do so. Adverts in the local paper have him as a real estate agent and car salesman.

15 March 1923

PRACTICAL ROUTE ROUND THE HILLS DISCOVERED.

Woy Woy’s isolation by road was ended on Saturday last, when Mr. V. J. McKenzie, of Gosford, drove his Buick Six, with the Shire President and Engineer, from Gosford to Woy Woy by a route along the western hills. The bridle track which had previously been used by Cr. Staples on horseback was round to lead through country ,the nature of which would permit of a trafficable road being made at comparatively little cost; and as at last Council meeting £250 was voted for the work from the  Government endowment, to be supplemented by a like amount from the rates, it is hoped that it will not be long before it can be announced to the North, and to the State at large, that motor and other vehicles can come right into Woy Woy.

The approximate distances are in miles:—

From Gosford via Main Road to Boys’ Home                        3 miles

From Main Road along cleared road past Parry’s                 1 mile and half miles

From cleared road over hills to Woy Woy Tunnel                3 and half miles

From  Tunnel over hills to Dillon ‘s Gap at formed road    1 mile

From top of hill down Dillon ‘s Road to bottom of hill       1 mile

From bottom of hill to Woy Woy                                               1 and half miles

‘Pilot’ writes: — When a Buick six cylinder car, driven by Mr. V. J.  McKenzie, of Gosford, and carrying two passengers, Cr. C. J. Staples (Shire President) and Mr. C. J. Fenton (Shire ‘ Engineer) rolled into- Woy Woy on Saturday afternoon, the locals could not for some time be convinced that this car had travelled under its own power and on its own four wheels from Gosford to Woy Woy. Yet this was the  simple- truth. It was all the more surprising because of the fact that, as any Woy Woyan will tell you, the town is isolated so far as road communication is concerned, and even a horse-drawn vehicle has not yet negotiated the rough bridle track running from the Woy Woy Tunnel to the road near the Boys ;  Home, about 3 miles from Gosford.

The news soon got around and caused considerable excitement when Mr. McKenzie’s accomplishment became known. Many were, at first, frankly sceptical, and those who were most inclined to doubt the truth of the report were those who know the track best — for they know from first-hand experience the difficulties of the mountain route.

It was known only to a few — and they had beforehand been sworn to secrecy — that the trip from. Gosford to Woy Woy by motor car was to be at tempted. And here it should be noted that the trip was undertaken without any preliminary examination of the route or any beforehand preparation of the track to be traversed. The ‘overlanders’ did not wish the attempt to be known for fear it might not be successful. When one particularly rough and apparently impassable natural obstruction was met with near the Woy Woy Tunnel, ‘ ‘ Mae. ‘ ‘ remarked, ‘I hope no one has got wind of this stunt in Woy Woy!’ And at this point the venturesome three feared that they would be classed as lunatics if they were to fail and the thing they had attempted became known.

But thanks to V.J. ‘s truly remarkable driving, the car was got through without mishap.

 The Shire Councillors have recently conducted a series of inspection by motor car all over the Shire, and on these trips ‘Mac’s’ skill in negotiating rough and awkward country that most road difficulties can be overcome by a daring and skilful driver.

This prompted Cr. Staples to suggest to Mr. McKenzie that it might be possible for him to negotiate the bridle track over the mountains between the Boys’ Home at Gosford and the Woy Woy Tunnel.

Always ready to tackle a difficult proposition, “ Mac” promptly promised ‘ ‘ to give it a fly.”

It was at first thought advisable to go over the route on foot to make a preliminary examination of the route. But last Friday night it was decided to ‘the attempt the next morning by dispense with the usual preliminaries  in a trip of this kind.

At 9.30 on Saturday morning a start was made from the Gosford Railway station. Three miles by road to the top of thee hill near the Gosford Boys Home was speedily negotiated and the journey really commenced from this point. Where a  cleared track leads off to the south right at the top of the hill. For a mile and a half the going was good, as the road has been cleared for this distance, ending near Mr. Parry ‘s holding.

From here it was found that the bridle track could not be negotiated by car on account of its many windings between rocks and up and down steep places.

A route was chosen over the hills which necessitated much hard work in the way of clearing trees,  grass-tree roots, and sometimes ‘rock chopping,”’ as well as roughly forming steep activities and declivities, and filling in dry water-courses to allow the car to pass. The only accident of the trip was met with about a mile from the Woy Woy Tunnel, one of the rear mud-guards of the car being badly buckled through striking a fallen tree as the car swerved to avoid an obstruction just ahead.

The telegraph line on top of the Woy Woy Tunnel was’ reached at 12.30 — just three hours from the starting time. And, considering the roughness of the country, as well as the fact that at many points the car had to be left while the route ahead was surveyed on foot, this was making good time. At this point it began to be feared that the attempt would prove a failure.

After casting around for threes hours to find a possible’ ascent of the high hills on the south eastern side of the Tunnel a way out was eventually discovered. A little over a mile of exceedingly rough going. in which several sharp, steep climbs had to be made by the car. brought the party on to the formed road at the top of Dillon’s Gap, leading from Woy Woy to Mr. George Dillon’s.

Here the party at last realised that the journey was practically accomplished, and that a few minutes later they would be the proud claimants of the distinction to be the first to enter Woy Woy from the outside by motor car.

At a spring on the roadside the success of the trip was drunk in good, clear water — the first good water that was found during the journey, though the travellers had perforce to drink from many stagnant pools along the route.

 It may be mentioned that no food or drink was carried on the trip — certainly a great over sight! The road down from Dillon’s to the railway line was found to be rough and steep, and its many awkward turns — it is only about 8ft wide with a precipice on one side — necessitated careful driving. But it was easy for ‘Mac.’ compared with the country he had been driving over all day, and the level land was gained without mishap.

Three-quarters of a mile of sandy track brought the car to the metalled road (Railway Street) near the Woy Woy South railway gates, and the car raced from here into Woy Woy with the ‘hooter’ in full blast. ‘The arrival,’ at 4.30p.m., seven hours after leaving Gosford, was celebrated at Hadley ‘s with a bottle of champagne, the cork of which ‘Mac.’ annexed as a souvenir’ of the great occasion.

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alfred vic

Then this happens his 25 year old son gets sick and dies.

7th June 1928

OBITUARY

ALFRED VICTOR McKENZIE.

The sad death, occurred in Quirindi Hospital on Monday evening, May 28, at 9. 15 p.m., of Mr. Alfred Victor McKenzie, aged 25. Deceased took suddenly ill a fortnight prior to his death, and was taken to Quirindi Hospital, suffering from enteric fever. Despite all  efforts by the three doctors and two nurses (one of whom, Sister McKenzie, was his sister), the patient gradually grew worse, and succumbed) on the Monday night.

Mr. McKenzie was operated upon on Monday afternoon, as a last resource. He rallied after the operation, but only temporarily. His father, Mr. V. J. McKenzie, of Gosford, Sister G. McKenzie, and sisters-in-law from Mosman were with him at the end.

The news of deceased’s serious illness, and then of his death, was very distressing to a large circle of friends and relatives in the Gosford district, all of whom held him in high esteem.

Mr. A. V. McKenzie, who was in the service of the Government Savings Bank of N.S.W., had been stationed at Quirindi for the past six years, and held the position of teller at the time of his death. Joining the Bank at Gosford (after a short term on the Railway staff at Gosford) he was attached to the local Branch for a number of years, after which he was transferred to Edgecliffe, and later to Quirindi. The late Mr. McKenzie was married in February last to Miss Dorothy Ferguson, at Mosman. Many friends sympathise deeply with the young widow, and with the other bereaved relatives in the sad loss they have suffered by his untimely passing. The mourners include Mrs. A. V. McKenzie (widow), Mr. V. J. McKenzie (father), Mrs. T. H. Pryor (sister), Mrs. Ray Fagan (sister), Nurse G.  McKenzie (sister), and Master Bruce McKenzie (brother). A shocking tragedy at the Woy Woy railway bridge on January 3, 1921, was responsible for the death of three members of the family — the late Mrs. V. J. McKenzie, and a daughter and son, aged 8 and 2.5 years. The Funeral On the arrival of the Brisbane Mail at Gosford on Wednesday morning, May 30, the cortege moved to Point Clare Cemetery. The hearse was followed by over 30 cars. At the cemetery the coffin was borne to the Methodist portion, and laid at rest beside the graves of deceased’s mother and little brother and sister. The Rev. G. A. Baily, Gosford Methodist Minister, officiated at the graveside, which was surrounded by a host of family friends.

Mr. Baily delivered a very impressive address. Among the relatives at the graveside were Mr. and Mrs. V. J. McKenzie, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Pryor, Mr. and Mrs. B. Fagan, Bruce McKenzie, Mr. and Mrs. Alf. Sterland, (sister and brother-in-law), Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson (mother and father-in-law), Mr. A. Wane (brother-in-law), Messrs. McQueen and Reichendah, of Quirindi, near friends of deceased, were also at the funeral.

Among the wreaths, the following cards were noticed: — From Daddy, Mummy, and your Sisters; Florrie and Tom; Marj, and Arthur; Ray and Edna; Lal. and Norm; Sterland Bros. And Arthur Wane; Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Moore; Mr. and Mrs. V. F. Fagan; Mr. and Mrs. Bert Moore; Mr. and Mrs. D. G. Pryor; Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Sterland; Syd and N. Gregory; Members of Quirindi Golf Club; G. And F. May; Mr. and Mrs. Creighton and Family; Lodge Rising Sun, Gosford; Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Stephenson, Daphne, and Duncan; Mr. and Mrs. F. G. McPherson; A. and L. Tetsell; Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Black; Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Gollan and Family; Mr. Breakspear, Inspector, Bank; Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Hill and Family; Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Murrell and Family; Mr. and Mrs. Clarke, Mr. and Mrs. Croal, Mr. and Mrs. Galloway, Mrs. Merchant; Edith and Lyal Sutton; Mr. and Mrs. Macqueen; Mr. and Mrs. F. Wheeler and Family; Charles T. Hills; Thomas Bros.; Dr. and Mrs. Howell, Quirindi; Mr. and Mrs. Parr, and Staff, Govt. Savings Bank; Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Nyall; Gosford Agricultural Association; Mr. and Mrs. H. Benson and Family; Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Campbell, Quirindi; Mr. and Mrs. G. Stephens; the Anderson Family; Mr. and Mrs. B. Hill; Dr. and Mrs. Magill; Commissioners, Govt. Savings Bank of N. S.W.; Mr. and Mrs. Bathgate; Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Mason; the Margin Family.

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The last mention of Victor J Mckenzie was in 1938 when he lived in Manly. He died in 1957 aged 81.

Keith Atkins

Grave site Roman Catholic 1 Row 3 Plot 21

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Keith Atkins, Bicycle messenger

8th September, 1944

Newcastle Morning Herald

CYCLIST CRASHED INTO TAXI

Shortly after noon on August 10, a bicycle ridden by Keith Alwyn Atkins, 15, messenger, of Healy-st., Gosford, crashed into the side of a taxi cab, driven by Herbert Cowper Ranyard, at the intersection of York and Mason Parades’ Gosford. 

acco maap

Atkins died in Newcastle Hospital that night. The Coroner. (Mr. A. G. Chiplin) returned a verdict of accidental death.

Constable E. .A ‘ Albury, of Gosford, said Atkins: rode his own bicycle. There was no brake Thomas Walker gardener, of Point Clare, said it was raining’: heavily He saw ‘Atkins riding down the hill and trying to pull a cape over his knees.

The taxi driver said he veered to the right but could not avoid the impact.

Mr. H. L. O’Neill appeared for the relatives; Mr. A. G. Downey for the employer: and Mr. N. Booth for the taxi driver.

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Gosford times

8th August 1949

ATKINS.— In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Keith, who died August 10, 1944.

It does not need a special day to bring you to our minds;

The days we do not think of you are very hard to find.

Always remembered by dad, mum and Fay.

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