Harry P. Ashburner

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Harry Patrick Ashburner Roman Catholic Section 2 row 4 plot 9

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Harry Patrick Ashburner

160 000 enlisted for King and Country into the various Military Forces. At Point Clare there are several three digit Service numbers  signifying these men were inside the first 1000 of enlistees. The following is a summery of  Harry Patrick Ashburner ‘s war record.

Harry Patrick Ashburner

 Service Number is Number 1.

Place of Birth Erskinville, Sydney NSW

Officially Aged 25  (but might be as young as 19 the is some discrepancy later on.)

Height 5 foot 9 inches

Complexion dark,

Hair Brown

Eyes Brown

Distinctive Marks “Vaccination Scar”

Religion Roman Catholic

His day job before the war was titled Clerk.

Place of Enlistment, Roseberry Park, Sydney NSW

 Dated September 10, 1914.

Assigned to 13th Battalion

Rank Private (10 September to  1 October 2014)

Annotations  on his records that he is to be made a Sergeant as he had  some prior military training.

Rank Sergeant from 1st October  1914 until appointed on 2 December 1914.

He was at Gallipoli in late May 1915.

Returned to Australia via  from the Port of Plymouth on  8th October 1915.

Discharged 16th January 1916.

In addition to other service medal it is noted that he is eligible for the “1914- 1915 Service Star Medal”.

Next of Kin   Mother with a Randwick NSW address.

The Following is a Link to Harry Ashburner’s War record

https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=3036749

 

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Edith Gell

Edith Gell Church of England Section 9 Row 1 Plot 2map template

Frank Gell joined the AIF in March 1916, he was 6 foot tall and 26 years of age. He was sent to the front in January 1917 and was killed in action By May 1917. Edel Gell, known as Edith was his widow.

Frank Gell’s war record
https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=4104373

Thu 15 Aug 1918 –

The Gosford Times and Wyong District Advocate

SOLDIER’S COTTAGE

Handed Over by Of fellows.

On Saturday afternoon last, in the presence of a very large gathering, the handing over ceremony was performed by the District Order of the I O O F.

The cottage erected by that Society for the widow and orphans of the late Private F. Gell,

who was killed in action in France last year. Since the outbreak of the War the Manchester Unity Oddfellows.

Of which the deceased soldier was a member the established a Fund for the purpose of assisting disabled members and their dependents, and Saturday’s function was a striking example of the practical work being done by the Society in this direction.

The local Branch of the Order has also given valuable assistance, with the organising of the entertainment for this event, given by “The Merrymakers”.

Mr. F. A. Stayner, Superintendent of the Boy’s Home, occupied the chair. He briefly outlined the  noble work performed by the Society and Unit of the Gosford Branch, as instanced that day, and had much pleasure in extending n hearty welcome to the District Officers, who had come to take part in the opening ceremony for such a worthy a cause.

The Chairman then called on the President of Erina Shire to address the gathering, and in so doing Mr. Archibold stated that it gave him extreme pleasure to be present at such an auspicious occasion, although he hoped it would be the last, as he had no desire of his to see widows as a result of this terrible war.

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But if such was to be the case he felt sure that Gosford could respond just as nobly in the future as in the past.

He had had the pleasure of knowing the deceased soldier (Private Gell) since he was a boy, and also his widow, and he was proud to have had their acquaintance. He also spoke highly of  his associations with Mr. and Mrs. Hall and family, of whom Mrs Gell was a member Referring to Private Gell the speaker eulogized the spirit of duty which prompted him to enlist and go forth to fight for the protection of his wife and children and the freedom of the civilized world.

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He sympathised with Mrs Gell in the loss of her good husband, but she had the satisfaction of knowing that she was residing among a hospitable people who would never see her in want. Mr, Archbold made reference to the healthy position at the front to-day, but advised his hearers not to

become overconfident. Everybody was expected to do their best to win this war. They had to prevent at all costs Germany from dominating the world.

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Personally, he had no respect for a German no matter how long he had lived in this country, and the only way lie could regard a German us good was when he was dead. On the other hand he bad the greatest respect for our own 6oidiers, and asked everyone to give consideration to the returned hero.

Of this number 600 had made the supreme sacrifice, whilst 700 had been invalided home. He was proud to say that the Society had pledged itself to the last copper, and no member or ‘heir dependents would ever be in want while there was a pound left in the bank.

He was proud of the members of the Society and members of all other Societies who had nobly responded to the call.

Brother Purkins, Deputy Grand Master, supported the remarks of the previous speaker, and said it was with feelings of pleasure mingled with sadness that lie was present on an occasion such as this On Monday they would be carrying out a similar duty at Liverpool. He hoped it would I not be long before the Oddfellows had a big surplus, whereby they would lie in a position to help brothers ! returning from the war. He was pleased to see so man} of the members of the Gosford Branch present, and congratulated the people on the interest they had shown in coming forward that day. | Bro Muston, , D.G.M. of Cumberland District, also spoke.

Brother Trohair then called on Mr. Wallace Moore, the contractor, to hand over the key of the cottage, and in so doing complimented Mr. Moore on the excellence, of hia work, the report of the Society’s Inspector justifying him in saying that the contract had been well and faithfully carried out.

The Chairman then unlocked the door, and presented Mrs. Gell with the key Mr. Thomas Hail, on behalf of Mrs. Gell, sincerely thanked them for the assistance the Society had rendered in providing his daughter with a home, also the officers for their presence there that day, and particularly the members of the Gosford Branch, and all other kind friends who had in any

way assisted to bring about the occasion of that afternoon’s assemblage. He also tendered his thanks to the ladies of the Gosford Red Cross, and concluded by saying that he could not find words to adequately express his feelings of gratitude towards the people he had had the honor of living among for so long.

Inscribed medals were presented to the following returned soldier members of the local Lodge, with honors of the Order : — Drivers J. F. Sterland H. T May and W. Sterland, Trooper B. Ward, and Private W. Goodsir.

Cheers and the National Anthem brought an interesting afternoon to a close, after which refreshments were served.

 

Lone Pine

The pine tree you see down by the front gateway.

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28 August 1915

Sydney Morning Hearald

LONESOME PINE.

HEROIC  FEAT.

FIRST BRIGADE’S WORK.

(FROM CAPTAIN C. E. W. BEAN, OFFICIAL PRESS

REPRESENTATIVE WITH THE AUSTRALIAN

FORCES.)

GABA TEPE, Aug. 18.

An inspection of the Turkish trenches captured at Lonesome Pine has shown what an extraordinarily formidable obstacle the First Australian Infantry Brigade was up against when ordered to take this position. For month upon month we had seen the Turks piling up colossal parapets, and could see that the place was a labyrinth. It was be-cause it was so strong and important, and because we desired to give the Turks a really heavy blow at the southern end of the line, that these trenches were chosen for attack.

The Third Brigade had made a famous assault on the landing; the Second made a wonderful charge at Helles. The First Brigade was therefore chosen to assault Lonesome Pine. It was a tremendous job to put before any brigade, but these Australasian infantry never from first to last showed the least concern about it. I was with them five minutes before the start behind the parapet over which five minutes hence they knew they would have to scramble in face of rifle fire, machine guns, and shrapnel. They did not know what might be awaiting them in the deadly space between the trenches, but not one man showed the slightest sign of uneasiness. A man would pass along the trench to find his platoon just as a belated spectator might hurry to a seat before the curtain rises. Passing he would recognise some friend.

“Good-bye, Bill,” he would say; “meet you over there.”

“So long, Tom,” was the reply. “See you again in half-hour.”

“Are you going to got a photograph of us?” they would ask me. “How do you work it on sandbags or through a periscope? What sort of camera is it? My word.  A great chance for a photographer.”

And then conversation was suddenly cut short by the voice of a little officer crouching just below a parapet: “Get ready to go over parapet.”

He glanced down at a wrist watch, and so did I, 5.27. The men crouched up a little higher on the recess, preparing to spring. Those in the trench below got a firmer foothold. The little officer unstrapped a whistle from his wrist, and held it between his teeth. He looked down at his watch again.

The man next me asked “What time is it?” I looked down. “Well, I make it 5.30,” I answered. The bombardment had apparently stopped. A few minutes’ breathless silence, then a whistle sounded. Within a second the little officer had blown his whistle, too.

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There was a scramble of feet over the parapet, the sound of falling earth, the knocking of accoutrements, the peck, peck of Mauser rifles from the trench opposite had already begun, and gradually swelled into a rattle. A man fell past me into the trench, bleeding from a wound in the mouth. Out in the scrub a line of our old pea soup Australian khaki was racing, jumping low bushes and wire, straight for the enemy’s trench. When they got there they experienced what in military phraseology is known as a check. That is to say, instead of an open trench into which they could jump and bayonet Turks they found themselves looking down on a solid roof of pine logs, covered with earth on which the bombardment had not made any perceptible impression. This surprise might well enough upset the nerves of some troops, but the behaviour of the First Brigade did not give the onlookers the least cause for anxiety. The men were clearly puzzled what to do, but did not show the least sign of ever thinking of retreat. Some ran on to the second and third trench till they found open trenches where they could fire down and jump in. Others strung out along the first trench, firing in to loopholes from which the Turks were still shooting.

lone pine 1919

Others jumped down into a few gaps left without head-cover; others noticed small manholes every here and therein the solid roof of the trench, and began to lower themselves into the trench feet fore-most through these, a feat of daring which, it had been a solitary example, would certainly have won the Victoria Cross in any previous war. Those who could not get in simply lay down outside on the parapet, firing down the communication trenches until they could think of something else to do. The first Australian infantry has made itself a wonderful name at Gallipoli.

Certainly no finer feat has been accomplished here than this taking of Lonesome Pine and holding it against a counter-attack-lasting six solid days. New South Wales cannot be too proud of her The Australian naval bridging train has landed with a British force at Suvla Bay.

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