Scotts

Robert Donald Scott Church Of England Section 1 Row 1 Plot 6

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The Scott Family.

23 November 1916

Death of Miss Scott.

Miss Sarah Maria Scott, who died at her residence, Point Clare, on Thurs

day last, was 83 years of age, and was the second daughter of the late Mr,

Thomas  A. Scott, after whom the railway platform, ‘Tascott,’ is named.

The funeral took place on Saturday, the remains being interred in the

Church of England portion of the new cemetery at Point Clare.

Rev. A. Renwick, Rector of Christ Church, conducted the burial service, and

Messrs. Creighton & Sons had charge of the mortuary arrangements.

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Robert Scott, another of T.A. Scott’s sons was making a living running a holiday home at the former family home called Waterview  (it was situated on the small hillock near Tascott railway station, now called Waterveiw Place). When this happened.

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16 December 1920

Railway Fatality at Tascott.

DEATH OF MR. R. D. SCOTT.

It is with deep regret that we have to record the death of Mr. Robert Donald Scott, an old resident of Tascott, which occurred in tragic circumstances on Friday last. Deceased left his home that morning and was returning from over the line about mid-day while the storm was at its height. As the roads were impassible he was compelled to traverse the railway line and was walking between the rails when overtaken by the Brisbane express bound for Sydney. Death must have been instantaneous. The accident was not noticed by the driver or fireman of the train. The tragic circumstances surrounding Mr. Scott’s death are heightened by the fact that hi§ son was standing on the verandah of his home and witnessed the accident which he was powerless to avert.

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At the inquest held at Gosford on Monday last a verdict of accidental death was returned. The late Mr. Scott was one of the oldest residents of the Brisbane Water district and was beloved and respected by all who came in contact with him. He was a son of the late Thomas Alison Scott, who was the original grantee of the land surrounding Point Clare and Tascott. He leaves a widow and one son, Mr. Thomas William Scott, who reside at Tascott. Two sisters, the Misses Martha and Jane Scott, reside at Point Clare, and another sister, Mrs. Annie Herbert, is at present in England, while his brothers are Messrs Archibald Scott, of Point Clare, and James William Scott, of Marrickville.

The funeral took place on Sunday at the Point Clare cemetery, the Rev. Arthur Renwick conducting the burial service.

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Jane Scott was one other of the many children of Thomas A. Scott. To which whom the suburb TASCOTT is named after. Having lived all her life in the Brisbane Water district, she clearly was not coping with the move to a nursing home in Sydney, decides to escape.

22 February 1923

ACCIDENTAL DEATH.

A verdict of accidental death was returned by the Sydney Coroner, when he held an inquiry into the death of Miss Jane Scott, aged 81, who until recently resided at Point Clare. , Deceased was an inmate of the Nursing Home at Petersham, but appeared to be discontented, and on January 15, during the temporary absence of the matron, she apparently climbed over the balcony rail and slid down the verandah post to within a few feet of the ground, when she fell. She died on February 15 from her injuries.  

22 October 1931

Death of Miss Martha Scott The death of the nonagenarian Miss Scott, which occurred on Oct. 11, and which was referred to in our last issue, recalls a number of interesting facts in connection ‘with the early history of the Brisbane Water district.

Her father, the late Thomas Scott, was the first man to grow sugar cane in Australia. He commenced its cultivation at Port Macquarie, and later, when he went to reside at Point Clare, he grew cane there, but soil and climatic conditions proved unsuitable. As the pioneer of the sugar industry in Australia, the Government granted Thomas Scott a pension. He was then a man of advanced age, but he continued to draw the pension until his death at the age of 105 years. His wife, Annie Scott, also died at the age of 105.

They reared a large family of 7 daughters and 5 sons. Three of their children are still living. They are Annie (Mrs. Herbert), who is in England; Mr. Archibald Scott (Point Clare), and Mr. James William Scott (Woy Woy). Strange is the fact that four of the family passed away on October 16, and all at Point Clare.There are 7 of the 12, of Thomas Allison Scott’s children buried here at Point Clare Cemetery, they are, Sarah, Jane, Robert, Martha, James, Harriet and Archibald.

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Robert Donald Scott.

AN APPRECIATION.

On Friday, December 10, As the result of a train accident near his home and railway station, Tascott, there passed away one of the best known pioneers of Brisbane Water — Robert Donald Scott,

Born in the district where he had lived tor over sixty-eight years, Mr. Scott was probably one of the most widely-respected residents. To know him was to love him. The present writer has had the privilege of acquaintance with him for twenty years and of appreciating his sterling qualities. Of quiet and retiring character, ho nevertheless possessed shrewd judgment and business faculty in his dealings, but his kindliness of disposition and unswerving honesty of purpose, combined with a wholesome sense of humor endeared him to all with whom Le came in contact. It may be said ‘truthfully that he made no enemies, oven among those with whom he was not always in agreement

For a man of his years he accomplished more in the way of daily work than is usually done by many much younger men. Methodical habits and consistent energy, aided by a sound mind in a sound body, were the secret of this. He lived the simple life, carefully conserved the blessing of health which was bestowed upon him, and tried to do all the good he could in passing through life.

This outlook and object are surely noble, but with Robert Scott they were faithfully adhered to, and brought to him great peace of mind and contentment.

The late Mr. Scott came of excellent family, of Scotch descent. As most residents of the district  now, his father, Thomas Allison Scott, was the first Clerk of Petty Sessions at Brisbane Water, and a man who made rely markable efforts early last century to J establish sugar-growing in New South Wales.

For his w ork in this direction honor to his memory has been accorded recently by the Royal Agricultural  Society of N.S.W. He lived to the age of 105 years, and lies buried in the old cemetery at Point Frederick, Gosford.

His uncle was Sir James Scott, Admiral in the Royal Navy, and other members of his father’s family were distinguished in mercantile pursuits.

His mother came from England as a child, and after her marriage lived at Point Clare for over seventy years, dying at the mature age of 93.

Two brothers, Archibald and William, and three sisters survive him. Two of the latter, the Misses Martha and Jane Scott, have been resident at Point Clare for many years; the other sister married Dr. Herbert, and was once resident in Gosford, but has been long away from Australia.

The late Robert Scott spent the earlier years of his life at the place of his birth. In his thirties he went to y. the metropolis, and for a time engaged in business. While there he also married. His native hills called to him, however, and he soon returned to Point Clare, where Mrs. Scott established, and developed to a wonderful degree, the boarding-house so long known as Waterview, a name very familiar to holiday-seekers throughout  the length and breadth of the State.

This famous house of accommodation, although Mrs. Scott retired from its management some years ago, remained in its old location until twelve months since, when unfortunately it was destroyed by fire. It was to serve the needs of this house that the Tascott platform was erected by the Railway Commissioners, the name being derived from the initials and surname of Mr.

Scott’s father. (T.A.Scott).

Mr. Robert Scott is survived by his Wife and son, who live near the old house.

The areas of the surrounding were his property, and at the time of his death he was actively engaged in preparing for sale a sub division, including the ‘Waterview’ property.

In closing this sketch, which it is? is all too imperfect to do justice sterling worth of its subject, what I write desires to record a profound sense of deprivation, both to himself and to the district, by the untimely removal of one who, had he been would have continued in the paths of large-hearted kindliness so lovingly followed, by him in the past.

His labors here have ended, and he is at rest, and so who remain are the

poorer by the loss of his benevolent and beneficient personality from amongst us, but his good works and legacy will not be readily forgotten by those who knew him, and will serve as his lasting memorial.

maria burt

21July 1916

Obituary.

Mrs Burt, aged 77 years, passed away at the residence of her only daughter, Mrs Archie Scott, West Gosford, at 9 o’clock on Saturday night.

Deceased lady was the relict of the late Sydney Burt, who in the early days, was a Sydney lawyer and also developed into a prominent business man, doing a large trade in shipping horses to India. It is related that on one occasion he shipped over 200 head and did not insure them. The first night after their departure he dreamt that he saw the vessel wrecked and the horses drowned.

Next morning he went to an insurance office and insured the horses. Sure enough two days later the Shine was wrecked at the very place Burt dreamt about, and not a horse was saved. Mr. Burt spent some years in Fiji, and during his career made, speculated, and lost three fortunes.

The late Mrs. Burt was a resident of Gosford for about ten years, and had been- ailing for the past three months. The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon, the remains being interred in Point Clare cemetery.

Rev, A. Renwick read the burial service.

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Frederick Cox

Fred Cox Methodist Section 1 Row 1 Plot 1

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First Burial at Point Clare Cemetery 1916 and Auctioneer and Trader Extraordinaire 

Methodist Section 1 Row 1 plot 1

Frederick Cox arrived in 1909 and bought a pre existing business from William Burns. It was a mixed business with branches in Gosford and Woy Woy. He traded in some land deals and was a licensed Auctioneer.

In 1911 we have Fred Cox proposing land sites with the council for a new cemetery. He was the President of the Progress Association and was one of the stronger voices of opposition when another proposed site on Presidents Hill was put forward.

15th September, 1911

New Cemetery Sites.

Mr. T W Connelly, District Surveyor, visited Gosford on Tuesday last and, accompanied by Mr. F. Cox, President of the Progress Association, inspected two proposed sites for the new cemetery, both  situated on the western side of Narara Creek — one on Crown land, and the other on land the property of Mr Fagan. We understand that Mr. Connelly favoured the latter site, and intends sending an officer to make further inquiries.

1915 funer scene

29 September 1911

Proposed New Cemetery For Gosford.

For a considerable time there has been a growing dissatisfaction with the site of the present cemetery, owing to the lower portion being so swampy that people object to burying their relatives and friends in graves that fill with water as soon as they are dug, with the result that the dryer portion, known as the general portion, is mostly used, and will in a few years become crowded. During last year the District Surveyor, Mr. T. W. Conolly, paid a visit to the cemetery at the invitation of some of the residents, and at once decided that something should be done in the  way of securing a fresh site and closing the present one.

He recommended a position on the western slope of President’s Hill suitable as to dryness and elevation, but strongly objected to by the townspeople, for the reason that the locality was too valuable for residential purposes and was within the population area. The Progress Association then offered to submit to Mr. Conolly several sites more suitable for the purpose, and recommendations were accordingly made of several areas which were inspected by the Surveyor, the best in his opinion being selected, and the Assistant Surveyor sent to test the site for depth of soil and drainage. The Secretary of the Progress Association, Mr. W. E. Kirkness, is now in receipt of a letter from the District Surveyor, requesting that the public be asked to signify their approval or rejection of the proposed site, which is about 24 acres in area, being Government Subdivision Nos. 133, 134 and 142, adjoining Messrs. Fagan’s property on Cooranbene Creek, West Gosford.

Little did Fred Cox know that he would be the first to buried at Point Clare Cemetery in January 1916. There is a stone in the Catholic Section, RC 1,1,1 that mentions a death in 1915 (Cecil Morris at the battle of Lone Pine) but there was no body buried in that Grave at that time.

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25th January 1917

IN MEMORIAM.

COX. — In loving remembrance of our dear father, Frederick Cox, who died January 25th, 1916. Inserted by his loving sons, Gunner R. K. Cox and Driver C. A. Cox, A.I.F.

cox

31 August 1922

MRS COX

OBITUARY.

MRS. FREDERICK COX

The community of Gosford were deeply Shocked on learning yesterday that Mrs. Susie Cox, relict of the late Mr. Frederick Cox, had passed away at her home, ‘Cora Lynn,’ East Gosford, about 9 a.m. The deceased lady complained of not feeling well last I Sunday, and later on Dr. Paul was called in unexpectedy — caused her relatives anxiety, serious symptoms being manifest, and, despite all that could be done by medical skill and expert nursing, she passed away* as above stated, at 9 o ‘clock on Wednesday morning, the cause of death owing to heart failure.

The late Mrs. Cox, who was 60 years of age, was a native of Kelso, Singleton, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bailey, one of the district ‘s best known families. Mr. Bailey died some years ago, but Mrs. Bailey still resides at Dunolly, Singleton, in her 80th year. Miss Bailey married Mr. Frederick Cox at Singleton, and her husband passed away at Gosford in January, 1916, his death being a great loss to residents of town and district. The late Mr. Cox was a splendid townsman, and his memory will be treasured by relatives and friends for many years to come. Mr. and Mrs. Cox came to Gosford about 15 years ago.

Mr. Cox purchasing the storekeeping business then carried on, by Mr. William Burns. Some years later, Mr. Cox retired from active business life, and built a beautiful home, ‘Cora Lynn,’ at East Gosford. During the war period Mrs. Cox and her daughter, Miss Ivy Cox, took a prominent part in Red Cross work, and many a kindly and unostentatious deed stands to the memory of a kind arid charitable woman. Two of her sons served in the big war, and returned after the Armistice had been signed. Of the marriage there were three sons and one ‘daughter, all of whom survive their  parents — Messrs Milton Cox (Parkes), Ray Cox (Gosford), Clare Cox (Sydney), and Miss Ivy Cox (Gosford). To them we offer our deepest sympathy in their irreparable loss, the funeral takes place this afternoon, in Point Clare cemetery, where the remains of Mr. *Cox were laid to rest some years ago.

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Cecil and Francis Morris

Grave Site Roman Catholic Section 1 Row 1 Plot 1

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Francis Lyle and Cecil William Morris
Both the sons of Sergeant 2nd class William Morris of Gosford Police Station,
Francis Lyle Morris died 21 October 1916, aged 20 years.
Cecil William Morris, died 6th August, 1915, aged 21 years. (as per the stone).

Unless otherwise stated all newspaper referrals are from the Gosford Times and Wyong District Advocate (1906 – 1954)

Francis Lyle and Cecil William Morris.

This is the grave that has caused the most historical anomalies in the written histories of Point Clare Cemetery in the past. The first internment occurred in January 1916 (Fred Cox), and with the Morris stone mentioning a date in 1915, the Morris’s grave site is often mistakenly listed as the oldest and first in the cemetery.

Cecil Morris died in 1915 at the battle of Lone Pine, none of the bodies from that battle were repatriated to Australia.

Francis Lyle Morris died just over a year from when the news of his brother’s death became known, yet not officially confirmed. When Francis Morris died in 1916, his father commissioned the headstone to have both the brother’s names on it, and as with the tradition the names were placed in the chronological order of the deaths and so Cecil’s name is above Francis’s.

So it is Francis’s burial plot and Cecil’s place of memorial.

The William Morris and family moved to Sydney in 1922 and lived in Abbotsford and are buried in Rookwood Cemetery.

We learn of Cecil’s war tale via a series of soldiers letters published by the local paper. There is below, a link to Cecil’s War record, it contains a particularly distressing letter (which has been included on this page scroll down) from Cecil’s father when he wants it confirmed that Cecil has indeed been killed on the war front. 

 

morris grave22nd January, 1915

A Soldier’s Letter.

Mr. Henry Hastings, of Gosford, now with the Australian soldiers in Egypt, writes to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Hastings: —

Suez Canal, December 3. — We are told no censorship will be exercised over these letters, but even so, I cannot tell much for we have to little time before the mail goes. Cairo is to be our destination, so after all it is to be hot instead of cold weather, but ‘ so far, I have not found the heat as great as, our Australian heat.

We have just passed a French vessel going the opposite way. She greeted us with English, cheers, and our band played the Marseillaise. The Canal is just wide enough to allow two ships to pass. Each side seems to be endless stretches of sand, while every little way along are men on garrison duty, who are very much in  evidence.

Our men are all well now. Ern Bailey (formerly schoolteacher at – Gosford), is very well, though like the rest of us, the heat has thinned him a bit. So are Donald, Ken, and Tom Robertson, and Cecil Morris; the Sergeant’s son.

Their friends might be glad to know, if they do not happen, to hear from them — and there are such hosts of letters, thousands in every mail, that no one knows whether many of them will ever reach their destination.

Young Burns, whose place adjoins “Fraternus ” on Mangrove Mountain, is on this boat, too, and Mitchell, who was in the Newcastle Scottish’ Rifles when George and I were there, and several men, too, whom I knew in Narrandera.

Alexandria, December 5th. — We arrived here yesterday, after -7% weeks. Two companies of infantry went out of our ship to-day. The New Zealanders left their ships yesterday, and with other troops have gone on to Cairo. We (the Army Medical Corps) will leave to-morrow. Everything is in readiness, and ‘Tights out” has just sounded, so I must , stop in a minute.

Egyptian; scenery so far seems to bentirely sand and rocks, but all the color of the towns makes them look like a bazaar or fancy fair.

Mena Camp, Pyramids, Cairo,

December. 7.— We arrived here at eight o’clock last night, and are camped right at the foot of the Pyramids, just about 10 miles out of Cairo. The British flag; is to be hoisted in Cairo to-morrow. The mail closes at once, and we are awfully busy, so I can’t write any more how. The ticket enclosed is a Cairo tram ticket. Loving greetings to you all, — HENRY.

The following link is to Henry Hasting’s War Record

http://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Gallery151/dist/JGalleryViewer.aspx?B=4768273&S=1&N=27#/SearchNRetrieve/NAAMedia/ShowImage.aspx?B=4768273&T=P&S=27

war mem gos

14th May 1915

The following is an excerpt of the local paper,

Word has been received that’ Mr Cecil Morris, son of Sergeant Morris, Gosford, has been detained in Malta Hospital suffering from a bayonet thrust in the leg.

9th July 1915

Private Cecil Morris, son of Sergeant Morris, of Gosford, writes

from Imafa, Malta, under date May 5 : — . –

I suppose you have heard all – about our battle with the Turks. I am wounded in the leg and hand with shrapnel after having bad a fortnight’s fighting. We were landed, under a perfect hail off shot and shell, in small boats each containing about 50 men.

Some of the boats by the time they reached the shore had nothing but loads of mangled humanity. The Turks bad hundreds of machine guns td ‘ concealed batteries .. commanding the beach, and it looked an utter impossibility for our men to land.

However, we fixed bayonets, jumped out of the boats into the water up to our waists, and made for the shore. We were soon struggling with wire entanglements fitted under the water, again there was heavy slaughter among the landing parties before we finally got to the land. The Turks then endeavoured to drive us back into the sea with the bayonet, “but our chaps, ‘knowing what was in store, fought as never a fight has been waged before and gradually gained foothold.

The coast where we landed is something like Terrigal round about The Skillion, and we had to scale up these huge cliffs that were absolutely swarming with the enemy. They were yelling “Allah, Allah!” and sounding all the British bugle calls.

Others were shouting out orders to retreat, the object being to confuse us. But we  had warnings about the enemy’s tactics and took no notice of them, beyond rushing their trenches with the bayonet.

The Australians fought with such grim tenacity, that the enemy gave way everywhere, and retired to the heights from where they fired volleys of rifle fire on the attackers below.

The Turks were officered by Germans. While we were landing, one of them stood up and yelled in English, ” Come on, you Kangaroo, you are not fighting Cairo now.

After an hour’s fighting, and with the assistance of the warships (Queen Elizabeth included), we had control of the hill and started to advance and built trenches under heavy fire for the day.

When advancing, the order was to run ahead about 20 yards, one at a time, and drop down, eventually forming one long line. During these operations’ I had a peculiar, creepy experience; I was advancing and ran up the required distance and dropped between two other comrades. I asked the one on my right the range and he did not answer. Turning to the one on my left I repeated the question, but no reply came. Both poor fellows were stone dead, shot through the head while still remaining in a firing position.

Needless to say, I soon shifted on. We were entrenched one night about 10 o’clock and the order came along from mouth to mouth, “Cease firing, Indians on the right about to charge.” So we stopped firing.

The Turks then came in thousands, but we mowed them down. This looked a bit “fishy,” and our officer told us to look out for anyone passing orders. Another order started to come along, and the chap that started it was grabbed. He turned out to be a German dressed in an Australian uniform. He has ceased to exist.

It was the second Sunday, at 8 o’clock at night, that I got hit. The wounds, however, were not serious, although I was packed off to the hospital at Malta. The British call us the ” white Gurkhas.” An English officer said he never saw men fight like the Australians, and that the fighting was worse than at Mons.

At time of writing I am doing well, but expect to be sent from here to England to get thoroughly well again. I suppose you know more about the Dardanelles in Australia than I have heard. We who have actually been in the firing line know little about things in general, the operations being so extensive. By the bye, when X was hit I was ordered to get back to the first dressing station.

While doing so as best I could, I met an old ” cobber ” and was shaking bands with him when a bullet came ” zip ” and planted itself in his shoulder. He coolly said ” Hold on, I will come with you.” Do not worry about “toe, I am not going to get knocked over/ . I have already had as many lives as a cat. I do not know where Lance Mason or any of the other Gosford chaps are. – Cecil.

This letter was published about a fortnight before his death during the battle of Lone Pine. Lance Mason to whom he refers to made it back after the war.

The following link is to Cecil William Morris’s War record.

http://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=7984266

 

names liveth24th December 1915

Killed at Gallipoli.

ANOTHER GOSFORD HERO.

In October last Private Mayo, writing home, reported that Private Cecil W. Morris, of Gosford, had been killed in the charge on the Turkish trenches at Lonesome Pine on 6th August last. No confirmatory news was received from the military authorities, and Sergeant Morris at once placed himself in communication with the Officer of Base Records.

Several cables were sent to and fro, and on 16th instant the following letter was received from the Department of Defence : —

‘ In continuation of letter dated 30th ultimo, a further cable has been received from Egypt that No. 160, Private C. W. Morris, 3rd Battalion, was last seen on the parapet of a Turkish trench seriously wounded. The foregoing is the result of an enquiry made to the officer commanding your son’s battalion. —Yours faithfully, J. M. Lean, Capt.”

The letter from the Defence authorities confirms the authenticity of Private Mayo’s statement, and there is little to ‘ doubt but that another of Gosford’s gallant young men has fallen in mortal combat against the enemies of our King and country Private Cecil Morris was the eldest son of  Sergeant Morris, of Gosford, and, had life lived, would have celebrated his 21st birthday on 21st October. He was educated at Gosford, Burwood and Fort Street Superior Schools, and was last employed as clerk in Messrs. Goodall’s office, Sydney. On the outbreak of war he enlisted in the 1st Expeditionary Force and was sent to Egypt and later to the Dardanelles. He was twice wounded prior to the storming of the Turkish trenches at Lonesome Pine. As already stated, Private Morris was but 21 years of age, and was an all-round athlete, just the type of young Australian that would play his part when acts requiring, grit and courage were called for, otherwise he would not have received, his death-blow on the parapet of the enemy’s trenches. We deeply sympathise with the parents and family – relatives in their sad bereavement, but they have the consultation of knowing that their brave young soldier boy died doing his duty with his face to the foe, as so many of our gallant young Australians have done in this cruel and world-wide war.

Note : It took a little while for Cecils death to be officially confirmed to the Morris family, the official date of death, from the armies records is the 7th of August 1915, but the family having heard before this official notification of his death, had the date of the begining of the Battle of Lone Pine put on the stone… (6th August).

dads letter

9th August 1917

ROLL OF HONOR.

MORRIS. — Killed in action at Lone Pine, 7th August, 1915, our dearly loved son and brother, Private Cecil Wm Morris. Aged 21 years 10 months.

No one he loved was by his side,

To bid a fond farewell ;

Or give one word of comfort,

To him they loved so well.

Inserted by his father and mother, sisters and brothers.

dead in action form

Francis Lyle Morris

Roman Catholic Section 1 Row 1 Plot 1

26th October, 1916

Obituary.

It is with feelings of extreme regret that we are called upon this week to report the death of Francis Lyle Morris, second eldest son of Sergeant William Morris, of Gosford.

The sad event took place in the Sydney Hospital on Friday morning last, the cause of death being *Bright’s disease.

The deceased who was 21 years and 1 month of age, was born at Carinda, and finished his education at Burwood Superior Public School. He entered the Postal Department as a telegraph messenger at Gosford Post Office, and at the time of his death was relieving Postmaster at Cessnock.

Four weeks ago he was taken seriously ill, and admitted to Cessnock Hospital. Sergeant Morris was later on sent for, and the young man was subsequently removed to Sydney Hospital, where the end came a week after admission.

Young Mr. Morris was a gentlemanly and courteous official, and was popular with all sections of the community. He had reached a high standard in the Service,’ and was a brilliant operator. His elder brother, Cecil, was killed at Lone Pine. At that time Lyle, though under age, was also in khaki, but withdrew in response to his mother’s pleadings. The remains were brought to Gosford and interred in Point Clare cemetery on Saturday afternoon. The funeral was largely attended, and Rev. Father Kelly conducted the burial service.

*Bright’s Disease is a term for Renal/Kidney failure.

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