Edith Gell

Edith Gell Church of England Section 9 Row 1 Plot 2map template

Frank Gell joined the AIF in March 1916, he was 6 foot tall and 26 years of age. He was sent to the front in January 1917 and was killed in action By May 1917. Edel Gell, known as Edith was his widow.

Frank Gell’s war record
https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=4104373

Thu 15 Aug 1918 –

The Gosford Times and Wyong District Advocate

SOLDIER’S COTTAGE

Handed Over by Of fellows.

On Saturday afternoon last, in the presence of a very large gathering, the handing over ceremony was performed by the District Order of the I O O F.

The cottage erected by that Society for the widow and orphans of the late Private F. Gell,

who was killed in action in France last year. Since the outbreak of the War the Manchester Unity Oddfellows.

Of which the deceased soldier was a member the established a Fund for the purpose of assisting disabled members and their dependents, and Saturday’s function was a striking example of the practical work being done by the Society in this direction.

The local Branch of the Order has also given valuable assistance, with the organising of the entertainment for this event, given by “The Merrymakers”.

Mr. F. A. Stayner, Superintendent of the Boy’s Home, occupied the chair. He briefly outlined the  noble work performed by the Society and Unit of the Gosford Branch, as instanced that day, and had much pleasure in extending n hearty welcome to the District Officers, who had come to take part in the opening ceremony for such a worthy a cause.

The Chairman then called on the President of Erina Shire to address the gathering, and in so doing Mr. Archibold stated that it gave him extreme pleasure to be present at such an auspicious occasion, although he hoped it would be the last, as he had no desire of his to see widows as a result of this terrible war.

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But if such was to be the case he felt sure that Gosford could respond just as nobly in the future as in the past.

He had had the pleasure of knowing the deceased soldier (Private Gell) since he was a boy, and also his widow, and he was proud to have had their acquaintance. He also spoke highly of  his associations with Mr. and Mrs. Hall and family, of whom Mrs Gell was a member Referring to Private Gell the speaker eulogized the spirit of duty which prompted him to enlist and go forth to fight for the protection of his wife and children and the freedom of the civilized world.

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He sympathised with Mrs Gell in the loss of her good husband, but she had the satisfaction of knowing that she was residing among a hospitable people who would never see her in want. Mr, Archbold made reference to the healthy position at the front to-day, but advised his hearers not to

become overconfident. Everybody was expected to do their best to win this war. They had to prevent at all costs Germany from dominating the world.

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Personally, he had no respect for a German no matter how long he had lived in this country, and the only way lie could regard a German us good was when he was dead. On the other hand he bad the greatest respect for our own 6oidiers, and asked everyone to give consideration to the returned hero.

Of this number 600 had made the supreme sacrifice, whilst 700 had been invalided home. He was proud to say that the Society had pledged itself to the last copper, and no member or ‘heir dependents would ever be in want while there was a pound left in the bank.

He was proud of the members of the Society and members of all other Societies who had nobly responded to the call.

Brother Purkins, Deputy Grand Master, supported the remarks of the previous speaker, and said it was with feelings of pleasure mingled with sadness that lie was present on an occasion such as this On Monday they would be carrying out a similar duty at Liverpool. He hoped it would I not be long before the Oddfellows had a big surplus, whereby they would lie in a position to help brothers ! returning from the war. He was pleased to see so man} of the members of the Gosford Branch present, and congratulated the people on the interest they had shown in coming forward that day. | Bro Muston, , D.G.M. of Cumberland District, also spoke.

Brother Trohair then called on Mr. Wallace Moore, the contractor, to hand over the key of the cottage, and in so doing complimented Mr. Moore on the excellence, of hia work, the report of the Society’s Inspector justifying him in saying that the contract had been well and faithfully carried out.

The Chairman then unlocked the door, and presented Mrs. Gell with the key Mr. Thomas Hail, on behalf of Mrs. Gell, sincerely thanked them for the assistance the Society had rendered in providing his daughter with a home, also the officers for their presence there that day, and particularly the members of the Gosford Branch, and all other kind friends who had in any

way assisted to bring about the occasion of that afternoon’s assemblage. He also tendered his thanks to the ladies of the Gosford Red Cross, and concluded by saying that he could not find words to adequately express his feelings of gratitude towards the people he had had the honor of living among for so long.

Inscribed medals were presented to the following returned soldier members of the local Lodge, with honors of the Order : — Drivers J. F. Sterland H. T May and W. Sterland, Trooper B. Ward, and Private W. Goodsir.

Cheers and the National Anthem brought an interesting afternoon to a close, after which refreshments were served.

 

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Jack Dransfield

Jack Dransfield Church of England Section 1 Row 2 Plot 39

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22 March 1917

A “Something.”

The following is an extract from a letter received by Master Joe Dransfield, Ourimbah, from Gunner Edmund Duffy, written from Somewhere in France : — ” I received your welcome letters. We are not allowed to send any souvenirs from the front to Australia. If I had the chance I would enlist a dozen times over, which every self-thinking young man should do in this war of all-nations. There are hundreds of young single men in Australia who shiver at the thought of enlistment. I consider that a young fellow with no responsibilities who will not attempt to enlist is not worthy of the name of “man,” but is a “something” that only thinks of his own skin. It will be the shirker on whom the worry of this will fall.

This young man Joe Dransfield, received this letter a year before he enlisted for World War 1 from his mate, Gunner Edmond Duffy.

Joe I am not certain is he was a cousin, a nephew (?) was somehow connected to the Dransfield Family from Ourimbah.  Gosford and the surrounding districts was a very active ground for local patriot volunteer organizations (Red Cross) and returned servicemen organizations.  A letter like the above was stirring the war effort and Joe joined up in 1918. Social events with parades and floats were common place. Even the provision of a house to one war widow to live in, show the support and popularity of these events.

The Dransfield family of Ourimbah was headed by Mr. Dransfield who was the Head Teacher of Ourimbah Public School and turns up in the local paper from time to time. The Grave we are visiting is the grave of the Headmasters son Jack Dransfield, 1919.

From his war record, Joseph Dransfield, we find that he is 22 years of age, 5 foot 11 inches tall, had a mole on his right shoulder, he enlisted the day after Anzac Day 1918. For a young man, He was married, yet widowed. His next of kin is listed as James Adams, step father and his belongings willed to Eileen M Bell. Religion is listed as Congregational. He has worked around locomotives, and has been accepted into the Railways Company. There is a letter from a higher ranking officer describing him as brainy.

Joe Dransfields War Record.

https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=3521454

Jacks father had a hand in the Australia day celebrations of 1916 at Gosford, and organised these costumes.

Joe Dransfield’s next of kin was notified just under a year from the enrollment date, that he was to return to Australia on the 19th April, 1919. He moved to the Eastern suburbs of Sydney by 1928.

With the Returning Soldiers they brought with them a deadly strain of Flu, a version of the Global Spanish Flu Epidemic of 1919.

Meanwhile in Ourimbah The Headmaster was having some fun with the kids, I reckon Little Jack (aged 12) Dransfield saw some of the following event that his father seemed to have something to do with.

12th June, 1919

Ourimbah.

Our Public School now has four teachers as well as the capable head master, Mr. Dransfieid  The “Kiddies” of the town had the time of their lives on Tuesday afternoon, when a man dressed up as Charlie Chaplin, paraded the main road and portrayed ‘Charlie’ in almost lifelike style.

Very soon nearly the whole of the school children followed up the caricaturist, and it was pleasing to hear the well-behaved — with a few exception? — hilarity of the girls and boys. This was advertising a picture show held in the School of Arts last  night, and the result was advantageous, for from 7 p.m children in crowds with their parents or friends were to be seen streaming to the show.

Then 3 weeks later, this happens to Young master Jack Dransfield.

3rd July 1919

LISAROW.

(From Our Correspondent.)

Bleak westerly winds and heavy frosts are being experienced this week, and after the pleasant weather we have bad for the last few months, the change is not altogether agreeable, but as we are past the  shortest day we can look forward to soon having warmer days.

The flu is still with us, but fortunately most of the Lisarow cases have been rather a mild type, and all have escaped having a relapse. Deep sympathy is felt here for Mr. and Mrs. Dransfield in the death of their little son Jack, and we hope to soon hear that their other son, who is also suffering from influenza, has fully recovered.

The many friends of Miss Fenn will be pleased to hear that she is now recovering from an attack of influenza.  Noticed your par in last week’s issue re reports from correspondents.

As your Lisarow correspondent was in bed with ‘flu I think he might be easily excused Lance-Corporal Reg Harrison arrived home on Saturday evening and received a warm welcome from his relatives and friends. We trust that the ‘flu epidemic will soon pass away so that we can give him a public welcome.

Big consignments of citrus fruits are now being forwarded to Sydney and Melbourne from Lisarow station, and good prices are being realised.

our jack

3rd July 1919

OURIMBAH.

(From our Correspondent.)

Owing to the influenza epidemic the Red Cross Society have decided to postpone for a month the benefit social organised for the widow of the late Private Nancarrow.

The district is gradually emerging from an attack of the ‘flu, and the Gosford Doctors have had a busy time.

There have been a number of bad cases, but thank God there was only due fatality. That was Master Jack Dransfield, son of the headmaster of the State School here. The lad was a smart and intelligent, and a general favourite .Double pneumonia set in, and in 48 hours he was dead General sympathy is felt for the bereaved parents and family, in which I join.

The remains were interred in Point Clare cemetery.

3rd July, 1919

Dransfield

Return Thanks.

MRS. DRANSFIELD & FAMILY, of Ourimbah, gratefully thank Mr. Ingram and son, also Mr. Ern Hawkins, for their kind help on the death of our dear son, Jack; also Mrs. Murtagh and Mrs. Ingram, for their kindness. Mr. and Mrs.  Dransfield and Family thank all kind friends for their sympathy, wreaths, cards, and letters of condolence in their sad bereavement.

7th August, 1919

Ourimbah Public School.

Mr. Dransfield, headmaster of the Ourimbah State School, has received the appended official letter from Mr. A. Edden, MP. ‘ Department of Education, Sydney, 26th July. — I have to advise you that the Minister for Education has approved of the preparation of plans and specifications for the remodelling and extension of the school building at Ourimbah. The matter has been referred to the architect of this Department with a view to the necessary action being taken. — Yours, P. Board, Under Secretary.’

 

21 April 1921

VALEDICTORY TO MR. & MRS. A. J. DRANSFIELD & FAMILY.

Residents of town and district were surprised to hear of the sudden departure of Mr. and Mrs. Dransfield and grimily from our midst. Mr. Dransfield has been headmaster of our Public School during the last 17 years, and it is regretted by all that his transfer to Patterson came so unexpectedly. Much credit is due to the Misses Zelma Morris, Margaret Young, and Lola Russell in making a hurried collection, with the limited time at their disposal, to fittingly convey the feelings of respect and esteem from all residents of the district. At 3 p.m. on Friday a representative gathering assembled at the Public School to bid farewell to Mr. and Mrs. Dransfield and family.

Mr. A. Pitt, who occupied the chair, said he had not been in the district very long, still it afforded him very great pleasure to say a few words on behalf of the citizens of Ourimbah and district, in recognition of the splendid teaching qualities of Mr. Dransfield. He has carried out his duties to the entire satisfaction of the public, being ably assisted by an energetic staff of assist ants, in the bringing up of a young generation, who will have to face the world, to encounter many trials, hard ships and temptations, and he sincerely trusted that they would benefit by the tuition of their late headmaster.

Mrs. Luxford, wife of our local station master, in a few well-spoken words, then presented Mr. Dransfield with a hand some pocket wallet, Mrs. Dransfield being the recipient of a beautiful earthenware nickel moulded salad bowl.

The Misses May and Joy Dransfield were presented with a silver purse and a Nellie Stewart bangle, respectively. Mr. Dransfield very feelingly responded on behalf of himself and family. He said he was very much taken by surprise, and offered his sincerest thanks for the gifts they had received.

All the children were assembled in a classroom, and were addressed by their departing master. He gave them good advice, and instructed them in the path they should follow to become worthy citizens of our Great Empire. The gathering then dispersed with three cheers for Mr. Dransfield, which were heartily given by the children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kit Sumner

Kit Sumner (nee Curtain) Roman catholic Section 1 Row 5 Plot 4

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3rd November 1932

Passing of Mrs. R. H Sumner

A DISTINGUISHED WAR SERVICE NURSE.

 With the passing of Mrs. Mary Katherine (‘Kit’) Sumner a life of Service has been, closed.  Sister Mary Katherine Curtain, was one of four sisters who enlisted for service with the Australian Army Nursing  Service overseas. She sailed from Tasmania early in 1915, and was attached to the 1st Australian General Hospital, Heliopolis, Egypt. Sister Curtain was later attached to the British Base Hospital at Rouon, France.

 Returning to Australia in. 1918, she was appointed Matron of the T.B. Soldiers’ Sanatorium, Launceston, Tasmania.

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Shortly after taking up this appointment she successfully applied for a position in New Guinea, and from the end of 1918 to 1926 she was on the nursing staff at Namanula Hospital, Rabaul. Previous to her resignation to marry Mr. Ron. Sumner, she was acting Matron of that institution.

 Mrs. Sumner was ever ready to help in any movement that had for its object the advancement of the town and district where she resided,, or any charitable movement, and Gosford has lost one who can ill be spared.

The funeral, which was one of the largest seen in Gosford for a long while, was conducted by the Rev. Father Donovan, and moved from Our Lady of the Rosary Church to Point Clare cemetery. She was laid to rest, with the birds singing and the sun striking through the trees. Here she would have known  contentment and happiness in life. May it still be her lot in death.

Members of the Returned Soldiers’ League formed a Guard of Honor at the church, and followed the coffin to the grave. At the conclusion of the service Bugler Hitchcock sounded ‘The Last Post,’ With Mr. Ben Sumner at the graveside were Mrs. Sumner’s three sisters and her little niece Pam. The sisters are Mrs. Dr. Arnold (Mayfield, Newcastle), Mrs. J. Keith (Sydney), and Miss L. Curtain (Melbourne).

‘Kit’ Sumner has gone ‘West,’ but a sweet memory remains, and ever there will be many a friend to whisper ‘Welcome Sister, Rest in Peace.’ The mortuary arrangements were carried out by Mr. R. H. Creighton,

The pall-bearers were returned men in Messrs D. A. Prentice, J. P. Trim, G. Wood, and A. K. Jamieson.

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8th March 1933

THE LATE SISTER SUMNER.

SYDNEY, March 7.

The Gosford district branch of the Country Women’s Association has obtained permission from the Erina Shire Council to plant a flowering gum near the Cenotaph in the Memorial Park, Gosford, in memory of the late Sister Kathleen Sumner, of the A.I.F. Sister Sumner, who was a native of Tasmania, served with the A.I.F., during the whole of the war, and she was for some time attached to the staff of the Base Hospital at Heliopolis and was later at Rouen. At the time of her death she was residing at Gosford.

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23 March 1933

An Appreciation

TO THE LATE SISTER SUMNER.

One stood under the glory of a late summer’s sky, in the fullness of the Creator’s art, revealed in the circling hills, tree covered, stretching to the mirroring clearness of beautiful Brisbane Water. A gathering of people representing a. branch of that great organisation, the Country Women’s Association, which has bound so many women in all walks of life together in understanding and in readiness to help and solve problems regarding women; its influence goes to the nurturing and solidifying of happy home life.

Yet another band! An important one indeed! Men who came back from that great conflict stood calm and brave as the trees above them; and we thought with gratitude and thankfulness of their great sacrifice in preserving our wonderful  country from the ravages of war. Men of our great British Empire.

These two representative bodies, with others, gathered together to pay tribute to a noble army sister and a great woman. We heard the words of appreciation spoken with much sincerity and feeling by both Presidents concerning a woman whom they both knew as noble. The planting of a tree by her fellow members will inspire the hearts of men and women who read the inscription as they pass or linger there. — ‘Civis. ‘

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