William Short Moase

Roman Catholic section 1 Row 1 Plot 14

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William Short Moase was the township’s  blacksmith wheelwright and farrier there are many advertisements for Moase and Sons in the local paper. The family had three sons and four daughters. The eldest William Mark Moase had a distinguished career in World War One attaining the rank of Sergeant and awards.

war rec

Upon return William junior became the Secretary of the newly formed Gosford branch of the RSL. Ern another brother was active in the local theatre scene and Victor was a keen football and cricket player.

Only two of the Moase daughters regularly turn up in the local papers and were very active amongst the community with both Eileen and Lucy being mentioned often in the social pages.  

William senior was 65 years of age in 1924, when his business moved further north along Mann street from its original site of just off the corner of Mann and Erina Streets.

I think he could see the writing on the wall as the horse and cart was making way for the advent of the automobile. William senior died a couple of years later aged 69.

shoes

Unless otherwise stated all excerpts are from the Gosford Advocate and Wyong Times

27th October 1911

Whilst engaged shoeing a draught horse last Friday, Mr. W. S. Moase, local blacksmith, received a bump on one side, resulting in the fracture of two ribs. We are glad to say he is getting on well.

20th March 1924

PROPOSED NEW GOSFORD HOTEL

The well-known site in Mann Street at present occupied by Mr. W. Moase, blacksmith, and Moane ‘s garage, has been purchased, we are informed, for the purpose of erecting a large residential hotel, built on the latest continental style. This building will be a great acquisition to the town of Gosford, as the position at the corner of Mann and Erina Streets will be a central one. We are given to
understand that the purchasers of the property are contemplating spending up to. £30,000 on the establishment to be erected on it. Mr. Bert Dalton is applying to the next Licensing Court for a license for the premises. The plan of the proposed building will be on view in Mann Street within a few days.

And in the next edition of the paper a poem was entered, note the poem makes mention of Mr Jack Weir the Butcher, and Father of the boys in the previous post. They were neighbours in life and 3 plots away from each other for eternity.

3rd April 1924

FORGING.

For years and years in passing, we have watched the embers glow, ‘

As Billy plied the bellows to the fire;

And now we hear it whispered that the smithy has to go,

The Bilmose firm of wheelwright’s will re-tyre

To premises up further, near the Cresswell lighting crew,

Where daily will the anvil chorus ring;

And sparks will fly from dynamos, and from the anvils, too,

While noise around that neighbourhood will cling.

It’s ‘shoer’ to be lively, and Jack Weir-ily will say:

‘Oh, blast the furnace and the hammers, too

nit the blooming beef at Knight, and kept awake all day,

From this great noise, I’ll soon bid tooraloo.

And Bill says ‘Holy Moases, boy, ‘I cannot help the row,

For iron on to iron makes a clang;

Don’t steel away, dear Jacky for I hereby make a vow

I’ll  get some rubber hammers for the gang.

So all will be quite peaceful and we close our little song,

And soon we set the stage for moving day;

So up the street a little, our old friend will come along,

And for the new hotel hip-hip-hooray.

ka cover pic track

13th March 1928

Death of Mr. W. S. Moase

THE INQUIRY. 

Mr. W. E. Kirkness, J.P., District Coroner, on March 12, at Gosford Court House, heard evidence concerning the death on the railway line on February 27 of Mr. W. S. Moase.

Constable W. R. Crotty, Gosford, stated that when he was called to the scene, a passenger tram was standing about ‘400 yards south of Gosford rail way station, and the body of deceased was lying on a stretcher. Dr. Paul came and made an examination, and pronounced life extinct. When going to the front of the engine witness found a pair of boat sculls, one of which was split through the blade, while the other was slightly damaged.

There was also a small bag of fishing tackle and bait. On the left side of the engine front there was some green weed bait, and on the buffer plate was portion of a pipe owned by deceased. With the assistance of others, witness carried the body to the residence of Ernest Moase, son of the deceased. Witness saw a notice on the northern end of the bridge, warning persons against crossing.

Dr. Paul deposed that there: was no life in deceased ‘s body when witness hurried to the railway  line in response to a call. There was a wound on the point of the chin, but no other external marks of injury, except scratches on the back of the right hand. In witness’ opinion, death was due to fracture of the skull, the blow on the jaw would be communicated to the skull. Witness had known deceased for many years as an industrious and respectable man, whose hobby was fishing. Witness had no reason to suppose that intemperance had anything to do with the death.

Frederick Gaven, fireman, living at Lawson St., Hamilton, said he was firing on No. 68, Newcastle to Sydney, and shortly after leaving Gosford heard the engine whistle sounded. The driver shortly afterwards pulled the train up, saying as he applied the brakes that the train had run over a man. Their speed had been 25 miles per hour. At the time the warning whistle blew, a goods train was passing. The line was slightly curved at the soot, so that witness could not see far along it.

James Edmond Parkes, laborer, Railway Street, Gosford, was fishing near Gosford railway bridge, and saw the engine of the passenger .train strike the paddles carried by deceased; they were thrown up in the air. Witness’ further view was obstructed by the train. Deceased’s boat was moored on the western side of the line, and might have been reached without walking on the rails. Deceased was a retired blacksmith of good character, whose hobby was fishing.

James Stott, stationed at Broadmead was driver of the engine of the passenger train. About half a mile past Gosford he noticed a man walking on the left side of the line, carrying on his shoulder something which looked like a piece of timber. Witness sounded the whistle as a warning; deceased did not turn round till the engine was within 10 or 15 yards, when he turned as if to walk across the embankment, in front of the engine. Witness immediately applied the air brake, and brought the train to a standstill; it stopped in about 120 yards. Witness went to the sixth carriage, and saw a man lying on the ground. Witness did not actually see the engine strike deceased, as he stooped to apply the air brake as soon as deceased started to cross the line, immediately the goods train passed. It was not possible to do anything to avoid striking a person on the line under such circumstances. Ernest John Moase, son of deceased, related that the body was brought to his house. Deceased’s life was not insured; he had no property, and left no will. He was born at Bradford (England), aid was a retired blacksmith.

The Verdict.

The Coroner found that William Short Moase, aged 69 years, at Gosford on February 27, died from injuries accidentally received through being struck by a passing train. He also found that no blame whatever was attachable to the train crew.

Coroner’s Closing Remarks. Mr. Kirkness., at the close of the inquiry, called the driver and fireman and expressed his sympathy with them in the unfortunate circumstance that had been forced, on them. He said that his knowledge of railway drivers, gained through cases of this kind that had come before him, convinced him that drivers had to accept the responsibility of protecting thousands of lives, and the safety of their train.

Without exception these men lived right up to their responsibility. It must be nerve-racking to be involved in tragedies of this kind.

stone

24th October 1935

Flying Spark Caused Death of Noela Bird

Coroner Warmly Praises Dick Wells’ Brave Act

‘I find that Noela Bird, aged 5 years, died, in the Hinemoa Private Hospital. Gosford, on October 13, as the result of injuries accidentally received on October 12 in Erina Street, Gosford, as the result of ‘her .clothing becoming ignited from a spark flying from a blacksmith’s anvil.

This was the finding of Hon. W. E. Kirkness, District .Coroner, as the result of a coronial inquiry last Monday.

Addressing Richard Wells, the Coroner said: ‘I must compliment and congratulate you on the bravo thing you did. The subsequent death of the child was in no way due to any fault on your part. You are entitled to the thanks of the public- and the Department I represent.’

Proceedings were watched on behalf of the Police by Senior Constable A. Brown who was also present to assist the Coroner.

BROTHER’S STORY TO FATHER

Harry James Bird, living in Watt Street, Gosford, father of the child, said, that Noela, who was 4 years and 11 months, and had been born at Terrigal, was sent on a message with her brother Bruce, aged 7 years, about 9 o’clock on ‘Saturday morning. A little later Bruce ran home and said that Noela had been burned. He stated that his sister and lie had been near the door of Moase’s blacksmith’s  shop, watching the sparks fly. Noela had said to him ‘My dress is alight!’ He had tried to put out the fire. With his wife, witness had hurried to the scene and had met Mr. Wells.

Noela had been taken into the home of Mrs Weir. They went with their daughter in the ambulance to the hospital in which Noela died next day. They had not ‘been able to find anyone who had seen the fire start.

Dr. G. M. Duncan, who treated the child at the hospital, stated that the burns were extensive, and the girl was suffering severely from shock. From the outset he ‘had considered the chance of recovery was slight.

‘RIPPED OFF CLOTHES’

Richard Wells, bread carter, deposed, that at 9 a.m. on Saturday, October 12, he was delivering bread in Watt Street, when Ire heard a scream come from Erina Street and saw a child, running with her clothes afire. He ran to her and tried to put out the flames.

noela b

Failing to extinguish them, he had ripped off her clothes. The child was taken into the ‘house of Mrs. Weir and the Ambulance called. He could see that the girl had been, severely burned. About ten seconds only elapsed from the time he saw her until the clothes had been pulled off. He had received severe burns on both ‘hands.

The Coroner congratulated the witness, as stated above.
Ernest John Moase, blacksmiths of Erina Street, stated that he was welding iron in ‘his shop on the Saturday morning and the sparks were flying about. He heard a’ child scream and went to the doorway from which he could sec Mr. Wells pulling off the burning clothes from a child. In his opinion the clothes caught fire from a spark from the anvil. He had just noticed that two children were standing at the doorway.

Senior Constable Brown stated that as a result of his inquiries he was of opinion that the burns had been accidentally received, and that there was no evidence of neglect or carelessness on the part of anyone concerned in the accident.

Sometime soon after the death of Noela Bird Ern Moase shut the forge ending the blacksmithing era in Gosford, and left the district.

rust wheel

9th October 1940                              

MRS. SARAH MARY M0ASE

The death has occurred at Drummoyne of Mrs. Sarah Mary Moase, of Gosford, at the age of 75 years. Sincere sympathy is expressed to her large family, all of whom are well known in this district were some of them still live.

The late Mrs. Moase’s, husband, Mr. William Moase, was killed in a railway accident at Gosford 12 years ago. The following are sons and daughters: — Mr. William Moase (Drummoyne); Mr. Ernest Moase (Port Kembla) ; Mrs. Breen (Gosford); Mrs. Chaseling (Tuggerah); Mr. Victor Moase (Five Dock); Mrs. Ridgewell (Lithgow); Mrs. Eden (Woollahra).

The funeral left Drummoyne after Requiem Mass and proceeded by road to Gosford where the remains were conveyed to the Point Clare Cemetery for interment.

The late Mrs. Moase was living with her son, William, at Drummoyne when her death occurred.

She had been devoting herself to the care of the children left motherless by the death of Mr. William Moase’s wife some years ago

11th October 1940

Funeral of Mrs. Sarah M. Moase

Many Floral Tributes The Rev. Father Berkery officiated at the funeral of the late Mrs. Sarah Mary Moase, of Gosford, who died at Drummoyne recently. The remains were laid to rest in the Point Clare Cemetery.

Floral tributes were received from the following: — Mrs. Lewis, Mi’s. Gleeson, Miss Paterson and Bob; Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Parsons and family (Lightfoot); Lionel and Kit; Royal Hotel staff; Coulter family; Ada and Bill Phillips; Olwyn and Jack Little; residents of Drummoyne; Mrs. Hennessey and Roy; Mrs. Guerin and J. A. Guerin; Mr. and Mrs. Jollow; Mrs. W. H. Parry and family; Mrs. Benson and Doris; Mrs. Coull and family; Mrs. Rose and Etna; Kit and Walter; Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Chaseling; ‘Richards’ Avenue (Drummoyne) residents; Mr: and Mrs. C. R. McNiven (Drummoyne) ; Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Eden and family; Mr. and Mrs. H. Mitchell and family; Mrs. L. C. Hill and Mrs. J. E. King; Val, Lorna, Tom and Yvonne Jollow; ?Jim, Lloyd, Vera, Doreen; Miss C. Fry.

tools b smiths

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